braised

Roast Cornish Hen With Hearty Veggies (5/60 Dish)

Roast Cornish Hen With Hearty Veggies

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This is one of those dishes I call a  “5/60 Dish“, which, especially for a home cook, are the most rewarding in terms of the ratio of time and effort to final delicious result.
It simply means that it will only require 5 minutes of preparation and 60 minutes of total time, from the start of prepping to having the dish plated and ready to enjoy.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Roast Cornish Hen With Hearty Veggies

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Roast Cornish Hen With Hearty Veggies

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Preparation :
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Braised Beef Back Ribs With Glazed Baby Rainbow Carrots

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All chef’s, once in a while :

WTF did I come in here for ??? 🙂


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Once in a while, I come across an unbelievable food bargain that I just MUST buy; these ribs are a typical example.
I had to go downtown Miami this morning, so on the way back home, I stopped at my Argentinian butcher in Hialeah to get some empanadas for lunch. There I saw these beautiful beef ribs for $ 3.95, which is less than a pack of chicken wings of equal weight will cost me at my neighborhood grocery store – go figure 😦
So, I had the empanadas for lunch, then started the ribs for a full-fledged, big and yummy dinner 🙂
(My butcher’s empanadas are as close to Argentinian empanadas as can be, nothing like the crappy ones one can usually get around here. After all, he is Argentinian)
But now let’s talk a bit about today’s beef rib dinner.
If you look at the pics of the preparation below, you might notice that the ratio of onions to meat is very high, about 2 to 1 in quantity. The reason is that since I usually don’t use red wine (or any other alcohol) in my cooking anymore, I like to add additional flavor and color by increasing the amount of caramelized onions and add some apple cider. It does not replace the red wine taste, but rather substitute one great flavor with another one. Also, instead of using flour to thicken the sauce, once the meat is tender, I remove it and set it aside, then push the onions through a fine mesh sieve and simmer the sauce another few minutes to thicken it.
And there you have it – another day, another wonderful meal 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Braised Beef Back Ribs With Glazed Baby Rainbow Carrots

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Braised Beef Back Ribs With Glazed Baby Rainbow Carrots

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Braised Beef Back Ribs With Glazed Baby Rainbow Carrots

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Braised Beef Back Ribs With Glazed Baby Rainbow Carrots

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pig’s Feet Souse ( Love It Or Hate It )

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Pig’s feet  are not everybody’s cup of tea, but for those of us who love them, they are a special treat.
I prepare them quite often, in stews, steamed, braised, Asian style, Latin style, German style; any way is fine with me 🙂
The following dish is Caribbean Style Souse, as I enjoyed it many moon’s ago a couple of times in Trinidad, at the home of my friend Lyron’s mother.
Very spicy and lightly acidic, with lots of vegetables, it was the perfect food on a hot day by the beach, spend in wonderful company and washed down with a few bottles of Carib Beer – nothing else was needed in those moments to feel happy and content 🙂
These meals (and times) are now in the distant past; all that’s left are the happy memories, vividly recalled by preparing the meals we enjoyed together then – Lyron and his wife Dorsey, my wife Maria, myself and Lyron’s mother, whose name eludes me after all these years but whom I always remember when preparing this particular souse………….
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Pig's Feet Souse

Pig’s Feet Souse

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Pig's Feet Souse

Pig’s Feet Souse

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Pig's Feet Souse

Pig’s Feet Souse

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pied De Cochon

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ANYTHING  sounds better in french ?! 🙂
I used to call my wife “Mon Petit Chou”, which sounds perfectly sweet and romantic in french. Translated, it’s “My Little Cabbage” :-(. Not as sweet and romantic, no doubt.
Same with my dinner today : “Pied De Cochon – which translates into “Pig’s Trotters”, one of my all time favorite second cuts.
Pigs trotters are very versatile, they are great fried, steamed, braised, and pickled.
The following dish was created today in my kitchen and, I must say, it was absolutely delicious (and pretty to look at, to boost).
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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More about Pigs Trotters
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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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” Geschmortes Rinder Herz ” (Braised Beef Heart)

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Tonight  I cooked dish two of my “Offal Series” :
– Braised beef heart with steamed chili potatoes and garlic broccoli rabe.
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Heart:

Marinate the meat for the the Braised Heart in cider vinegar for 8 hours,
strain and dry the meat. Season with Dijon, soy saucegarlic powder, onion powder,
and pepper. Sautee on high heat until golden, add onions and garlic and saute
until garlic becomes fragrant. Deglaze with  plenty of good merlot, add demi glace
and simmer until meat is tender, about one hour. Adjust seasoning if necessary.

Potatoes :

Peel potatoes, cut into wedges  and simmer in salted water until almost done.
Strain. Saute chili flakes in plenty of butter on low heat until fragrant, add potatoes
and salt, cover. Leave on very low heat until heated through and fully done.

Broccoli rabe :

Saute Garlic paste until fragrant, add blanched rabe , salt, cayenne and
maggi seasoning and saute until heated through.

Serve with a good sized glass (or two) of the same merlot you use in the sauce  🙂

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

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” Beer Braised Turkey Leg’s “

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Last night’s dinner brought out the very best one can get from turkey legs’s:
Tender, juicy, loaded with flavor, accompanied by a wonderful herbed rice.
In my opinion, turkey doesn’t get much better than that  🙂
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Turkey :

Ingredients :

Turkey legs,                bone in
Morcilla,                     diced
Beer,                             a bottle or two of your favorite
Bell peppers,              diced
Onions,                       diced
Garlic,                          paste
Scallions,                    sliced
Oregano                      “Litehouse” freeze dried
Basil                             “Litehouse” freeze dried
Chives                          “Litehouse” freeze dried
Maggi
Grape tomatoes
Tomato sauce            canned
Oil,                               to sautee

Method :

Saute legs in oil until golden, remove and reserve.
Sautee peppers, remove, reserve.
Sautee onions and garlic until translucent, add Morcilla, tomato sauce
and beer, return leg’s and half the peppers to the sauce.
Add salt and pepper and simmer until legs are tender. Shortly before the
end of the cooking process, carefully remove legs into another pot.
Strain sauce onto legs, add remaining peppers, tomatoes and chives.
Bring back to simmer for one more minute and serve.

Rice :

Ingredients :

Jasmin Rice,             soaked for two hours, washed repeatedly
Butter                          melted
Herbs                         fresh or freeze dried
Salt & cayenne pepper to taste

Method :

Cook rice in boiling plain water for approximately 4 minute, or until tender but not mushy (Polo Method)
Strain rice and with a fork mix in the butter, seasoning and herb’s.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Happy Bastille Day France ! (Coq au Vin )

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Let’s celebrate the day with a classic  ” Coq Au Vin “.
But first :

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” Bastille Day is the name given in English-speaking countries to the French National Day, which is celebrated on the 14th of July each year. In France, it is formally called La Fête Nationale (The National Celebration) and commonly Le quatorze juillet (the fourteenth of July). It commemorates the 1790 Fête de la Fédération, held on the first anniversary of the storming of the Bastille on 14 July 1789; the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille fortress-prison was seen as a symbol of the uprising of the modern nation, and of the reconciliation of all the French inside the constitutional monarchy which preceded the First Republic, during the French Revolution. Festivities and official ceremonies are held all over France. The oldest and largest regular military parade in Europe is held on the morning of 14 July, on the Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris in front of the President of the Republic, French officials and foreign guests.”
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To help you celebrate at home (or just to have a great meal because it is saturday
or whatever day     🙂 ,
here is one of my old standby’s for a hearty meal.  And just because there is a lot
of wine in the marinade and sauce does not mean you should not make the meal
even better with another bottle of grat red wine.
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                                                          Photo Credit: Hans D. Susser

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Marinade :

Chicken 1200 gr , 8 cut, Bone in
Bay Leaves                                    5 ea
Thyme Sprig                                 2 ea
Rosemary Sprig                           1 ea
Cloves                                            5 ea
Mirepoix                                       1 lb
Garlic chopped                            5 Gloves
Burgundy Red                              1 ½ qt

Preperation:

Olive Oil                                       2 oz
Tomato Paste                              2 oz
Sweet  Paprika Powder             1 oz
AP Flour                                       3 oz
Salt & Black Pepper                   to Taste

For the Garnish :

Butter                                             1 oz
Bacon                                             3 oz
Button Mushrooms                     5 oz
Silver Onions, parboiled           3 oz
Parsley, chopped                         1 oz
Salt & Black Pepper                     to Taste
Heart shaped toasted bread wedges

Method :

In a stainless steel container combine the chicken and the marinade
ingredients for 24 hours.
Remove the chicken, pat dry and season liberally with salt and freshly
ground black pepper.
In a heavy cast iron pan, sauté the chicken in the olive oil until mahagony brown.
Remove the chicken, add flour and sauté until dark brown roux forms.
Return the chicken together with the stock, mirepoix , cloves, bay leaves, herbs and cover.
Place in a 300* oven until chicken is tender, approx. 30-40 minutes.
Remove chicken and strain the sauce in a saucepan. If necessary,
simmer and reduce the sauce until it reaches the desired consistency.

Garnish:

Render the bacon until crispy. Remove the bacon , add the butter, mushroom and onion and sauté for one minute. Add parsley, salt and pepper to taste.

To serve :

Place the chicken on a platter, cover with sauce , garnish with mushroom and onion and top with toast’s.
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” Osso Buco “

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Poor people who go through life saying :  Food?  Yeah , whatever.  😦

Tonight’s dinner , another few ounces sticking to my rib’s.
” Osso Buco ” , this one made with beef shanks instead of veal shanks.

 Bon Appetit ! Life is Good !
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” Overcooked “

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I love braised meat.

However, I hate it when folk’s say
” It was so good, it fell of the bone “.

If it  ” fall’s off the bone  ”  it is OVERCOOKED.   😦
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” I read this half- assed article by a very prominent and famous TV chef…”

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Slow Roasted Teriyaki  “ Osso Buco ”

Here is what I cooked for myself (& Bella) after I read this half- assed article by a very prominent and famous TV chef/ judge on iron chef , that you have to braise veal shanks for a long time to make them edible.
What a load of crap, as usual, from one of our “recipe chefs ” on TV, most of which have no clue how to cook or be a “chef” in the real world.
Yes, a good traditionally braised Osso Buco can be a wonderful dish, but you lose most of the beautiful texture of the shank. In southern Germany and Austria we have a dish called   “Gebratene Kalbshaxe”  (usually and ideally spit roast ). Just season with salt and pepper, then SLOWLY !!! roast (whole shank or thickly sliced)  until the connective tissues break down (at least 2.5 hours, often up to 4 hours) and you will have the most succulent, tasty, satisfying dish imaginable. During the last 15 minutes, baste liberally with teriyaki sauce.
Just goes to show that if you know and understand only part of something, to pass that on as the full truth will screw up the knowledge of the person who asked you for advise. Happens all the time with non-experienced so called “Chefs” and “Teachers”,  who get all their knowledge and skills by sitting on a school bench instead of learning and, most important, experiencing, the facts, beauty and excitement of cooking  in the real world, through observing and learning from REAL chefs in a REAL kitchen and soaking  up the knowledge and skills offered to them with the passion of a real chef.


Bon Appetit !    Life is Good !
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