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Pork Sinigang (Sinigang na Baboy)

Yesterday  I had a long-standing wish fulfilled 🙂
(Mind you, there are “BIG WISHES” in life and then there are “small wishes” This was a small wish, but nevertheless, I am happy that it finally came through)
For years, I wished there’d be a good Filipino restaurant in my neighborhood, but there is only one that I know of within a few miles around, and frankly, that one sucks!
I don’t want to go into details, but believe me, if it would be halfway decent I would still go there. I have tried it three times, but all three times it was VERY disappointing, so I stopped going there and gave up hope. Whenever I needed a Pinoy food-fix, I had to prepare it myself.
So yesterday I went to do some errands in a close-by shopping center to which I have been going for more than 15 years. Much to my surprise, I saw a “new” restaurant named Manila Grill&BBQ  tucked away in a corner. (I asked an employee how long they’ve been open and he said more than two years)
I had never noticed it before, maybe because what sticks out on the sign is  Grill & BBQ,  so one does not quickly associate this with Pinoy food………..
The place is very clean, simply but nicely appointed and the employees are very friendly, attentive and professional.
The food, THE FOOD 🙂 – it was absolutely delightful, very authentic, nicely presented and wonderfully tasty. The prices are moderate and overall, it was one of the best lunch experiences I had in any restaurant in Miami in years.
You can read more about it here: Manila Grill & BBQ, Pembroke Pines, Florida
So now, back to the dish at hand,  Sinigang Na Baboy
Sinigang is a sour soup native to the Philippines. Beef, pork, shrimp, fish, and even chicken (sinampalukang manok) can be used. The one featured here today uses pork as the main ingredient. One can use boneless pork, though bony parts of the pig known as “buto-buto” are usually preferred. Neck bones, spare ribs, baby back ribs, and pork belly all can be used.
The most common vegetables used are egglant, okra, onion, green beans, tomato and taro root.
The most common souring agent is tamarind juice, (sampalog), but if not available, you can use calamansi, lime, lemon,  guava, bilimbi (kamias), green mango, pineapple, and wild mangosteen (santol) To go an even easier route, you can buy instant “Sinigang Mix” ready to add to the stock while cooking. (For my personal taste this is too salty and not sour enough)
Today I went to look-up the sinigang I posted before on ChefsOpinion, but much to my surprise I could not find a single post, although I cook sinigang quite often. I then checked my folder of unpublished posts and low and behold, there was a bunch of pics of a sinigang I cooked about 6 years ago but never published. Looking at the quality of the pics I understand why I hesitated, but what the heck, here it is:
Sinigang na baboy from the distant past 🙂
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Masaya Ang Buhay !   Kainan Na !
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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

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Seafood , wine, olive oil, tomatoes, onions, garlic, beans and potatoes give this dish that familiar taste and appearance you’ll find when ordering seafood stew along the coast of Portugal and it’s islands.
Maria and I have had this particular stew (sometimes with, sometimes without the beans) a couple of times in the home of one of our friends in Funchal, Madeira, while living there, ca 17 years ago.
Served with rustic bread and LOTS of red Douro (Portuguese wine from vineyards along the Douro river) and Madeira (fortified wine from the islands of Madeira), seafood cooked in wine has since become one of my favorite meals to share with friends, and it has been one of the foods I remember most of that happy time, that beautiful country and its wonderful people.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Food and Memories of Portugal  on  ChefsOpinion
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Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

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Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

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Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

Shrimp And Octopus Stewed In Red Wine

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Fajas De Res

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To  prepare a great meal is no problem for most of us –
as long as there is plenty of time, money and somebody who cleans up the mess afterward.
But what if there isn’t ??  Well, how about this easy solution: Fajas De Res (Beef Fajitas)
– Cut and marinate the beef and onions: 3 minutes
– Saute the beef: 2 minutes
– Prepare the guacamole: 3 minutes
– Reheat pre-made tortillas: 2 minutes
– prepare salsa Mexicana: 4 minutes
– All in all, no more than 15 minutes for a smashing dinner. Life is Good 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Viva Mexico !
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Click here for  Salsa Mexicana Recipe  and  Guacamole Recipe  on  Chefsopinion
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For the fajas, cut beef flank into slices or batons, season with kosher salt, cayenne pepper and granulated garlic to taste, saute with sunflower oil in a VERY hot pan or comal until rare, add chopped onions, saute another minute. Serve with salsa Mexicana, guacamole, sour cream, and chilies.
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This Is Not A Pretty Picture……….

Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo

Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo

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This  Is Not A Pretty Picture……….just a darn tasty and satisfying dish 🙂
Just as any other food blogger who is making big efforts to produce a popular food blog, I usually strive to present my food as “pretty” as possible (Food Porn anybody?)
But, today I was not interested in that at all. Instead, I was rather hoping that the essence of this meal shines through to my readers, by showing it as natural as possible, emphasizing it as the great comfort food it actually was. This meal was so tasty and satisfying, additional “fru fru” would just have distracted from its simplicity and down to earth flavors and textures.
So, without further ado, here it is –

“Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo”
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more about  Yuca (Cassava)
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Click here for more about  Mojo
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Click here for more  Turkey Leg  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for  instruction on how to prepare  Collard Greens  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for instructions how to prepare  Yuca In Mojo
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Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo

Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo

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Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo

Smoked Turkey Leg With Collard Greens And Yuca In Mojo

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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London Broil

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While  you can use just about any flat cut of beef to prepare  London Broil,  “Teres Major” (or Faux Tender) was what I had on hand today. It was perfect for the cooking method of London Broil – VERY slowly broiled on both sides until rare, then rested for another 15 minutes, lightly covered, during which time the carry-over heat took the meat to a beautiful, even medium. (Contrary to most folks, I like to cook the tougher cuts of meat a bit more than rare, somehow the texture appeals more to me.
On the other hand, cuts of meat which are more tender, are always served med-rare or rare at my house, unless I have guests who prefer otherwise.
(My guests always play the first fiddle) 🙂
Accompanied by sauteed potatoes and green asparagus, this was a wonderful, tasty and somewhat rugged meal greatly enjoyed by Bella and myself.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Piri Piri Chicken With Portuguese Fried Rice

 

Piri Piri Chicken

Piri Piri Chicken

Here  we have two beloved Portuguese dishes which are not typically recognized as Portuguese staples (rice) and chicken (piri piri chicken).
Piri piri chicken is a favorite way of preparing chicken/poultry in most parts of Portugal, especially in Lisbon. I remember eating grilled chicken brushed with a spicy sauce in Lisbon way back in the seventies and then twenty five years later again, when I lived on Madeira with Maria, although I did not recall the “piri piri” part until I came across this video on my Portuguese friend’s Peter a few weeks ago (see link below) .
As for “Portuguese fried rice”, any cuisine in which rice features as a staple also has at least a few fried rice recipes, since everybody is used to reheat the leftover rice in a pan and adding “stuff” to it, usually in the form of other leftovers and/or veggies, seasoning, eggs, protein etc.
Grilling over an open fire is, of course, one of the best ways to cook chicken (or most other protein, no matter the country, style of cuisine or occasion. Brushing the meat when it almost ready to be served with a savory, spicy sauce and a squirt of fresh lemon or lime is all one needs to lift said protein (or vegetables) one more step up to reach culinary heaven 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more info about  Piri Piri Sauce
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Click here for a short video about  Piri Piri Chicken
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Click here for more info about  Food , Dining & Drinks In Portugal
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Pls note :
Piri piri sauce is prepared in a myriad of different ways, depending on the country, region, family preference, etc. The one essential common ingredient is the use of piri piri peppers. Also, the amount of piri piri you brush onto your food depends on your own preference. As you can see in the picture, I love to be generous with my thicker than usual  piri piri 🙂
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Hans’ Piri Piri Sauce Recipe :
4 tablespoons lemon juice, 5 tablespoons olive oil1cup vinegar, 1/4 cup sweet chili sauce (optional), 1 tablespoon garlic, minced, 1 tablespoon paprika, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon piri piri peppers ;
Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth.

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Piri Piri Chicken And Portuguese Fried Rice

Piri Piri Chicken And Portuguese Fried Rice

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Portuguese Fried Rice

Portuguese Fried Rice

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Piri Piri Chicken And Portuguese Fried Rice

Piri Piri Chicken And Portuguese Fried Rice

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Being a Chef.......
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Red Velvet Waffles (The Good Ones)

Good Red Velvet Waffles

Good Red Velvet Waffles


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 since I bought a new waffle iron about a year ago, waffles have become one of my favorite “Quickies” (Get your mind out of the gutter) 🙂
I prep them usually about once a week, sweet or savory, with whatever I dream up that could go well with or within waffles. The one thing I stayed away from were red velvet waffles. Whenever I looked up a recipe, it contained red food coloring, usually about 2 tablespoons of the stuff for 2 cups of flour. Now I admit that I have used food coloring on occasions to  enhance  a color, but I abhor to use coloring as the only means to create color in food.
Of corse, the simple solution is to add red fruit puree for sweet waffles or red vegetable puree for savory waffles. This will give the waffles both flavor and color and eliminates the need for food coloring.
The results are beautiful waffles with a shiny, golden outside and a bright, pleasant and appetizing pink interior with full, satisfying fruit- and chocolate flavor.
And there you have it…….. “Good” Red Velvet Waffles 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Waffles  on  ChefsOpinion
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Waffle Batter :
Ingredients :
1. 1/3   cup flour, 4 tsp baking powder, 1/2 tsp sugar, salt to taste, 1/2 cup melted butter, 1 cup strawberry coulis, 1 tblsp chocolate powder, two egg yolks (whisk the two egg whites to stiff peaks)
Method :
Mix dry ingredients well, add strawberry coulis, egg yolks and melted butter, fold in whisked egg whites
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Good Red Velvet Waffles

Good Red Velvet Waffles

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Good Red Velvet Waffles

Good Red Velvet Waffles

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Szegediner Gulasch (Székelykáposzta / Székelygulyás)

Szegediner Gulasch

Szegediner Gulasch


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Szegediner Gulasch  ( Krautgulasch) is a pork goulash (gulasch) prepared with sauerkraut and sour cream. It probably originated in the Austrian/ Vienna cuisine. (Pork is not typically used for goulash in classic Hungarian cuisine).
The Austrian/German name Szegediner Gulasch is probably misleading since the Hungarian name for the (Austrian) dish does not connect to the city of Szeged, but rather to the Hungarian writer  József Székely, who wrote favorable about this Viennese dish.
In Vienna, Szegediner Gulasch is usually served with serviettenknoedel, potatoes or rustic bread.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Goulash  on  ChefsOpinion
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Szegediner Gulasch

Szegediner Gulasch

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Szegediner Gulasch

Szegediner Gulasch

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Preparation :
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Poor Man’s Crab Meat Risotto – Kani Kama Risotto

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Residing  close to Hialeah means one can buy a lot of goodies by the roadside from “flying vendors”, who sell anything from the trunk of their cars, – electronics, Christmas decorations, clothes, steaks, flowers, fruit, churros, plants, mani, limes, and of course, “fresh seafood”.
I suspect that most of this stuff comes from a “fell off the truck supplier”, but who knows 🙂
My neighbor, Maribel, showed me some of the bargains she bought yesterday from a roadside seafood dealer and asked me if I can replicate one of her favorite dishes, crab meat risotto. Of course, I was happy to do this for her and her husband, as I do cook at least twice a month for them. I asked her to bring me the crab meat; I had the rest of the ingredients in my larder and fridge, so no problem. Well, to no surprise to me, the $10.00 pack of “crab meat” turned out to be Surimi (Kani Kama). To the seller’s credit, at least it was in good shape and smelled and felt very fresh when defrosted, so I explained to Maribel that I can make a seafood risotto for her and that it would be a great dish, although with a basic seafood taste instead of crabmeat taste. And so I did, using the surimi and clam juice for flavor, and the resulting risotto looked great, tasted great and, most important, it made my neighbors happy. (I assume the “crabmeat risotto” which they usually eat at their favorite restaurant in Hialeah is not exactly loaded with “real crabmeat” either 🙂
So there you have it – a wonderfully tasty and pretty dish for the price of a basic “fish and rice” meal. Mission accomplished! 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click her for more  Risotto  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click her for more  Seafood  on  ChefsOpinion
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Poor Man's Crab Meat Risotto

Poor Man’s Crab Meat Risotto

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Poor Man's Crab Meat Risotto

Poor Man’s Crab Meat Risotto

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Duck For Dummies………

Duck For Dummies

Duck For Dummies

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Many  folks shy back from preparing duck because of it’s stigma of being difficult to prepare. Now, I admit, duck can be royally screwed-up if you don’t know what you are doing, just like anything else. Many chefs, in order to hoot their own horn,  will also try to convince you that cooking duck, especially a whole duck, is difficult and can only be mastered by an expert. While everything is easy if you are an expert, cooking a whole roasted duck doesn’t have to be difficult or fussy. With just a few hours’ roasting and hardly any work at all, you can have a very tasty, very tender, very juicy bird with very crisp skin.
All you need is a duck (you don’t say), salt, a wire rack and an oven. No need for fancy seasoning, fancy equipment or anything else fancy.  Duck meat is very tasty in itself, so you don’t need to get into complicated spices, glazes, etc. In fact, you only need a sauce with your duck if you serve a starchy side-dish.
If you opt to enjoy the duck by itself, either as a main course or an appetizer, the meat alone, without any distraction such as a side dish or sauce, should make you a happy camper.
The following recipe is absolutely foolproof.
The result looks great, tastes like heaven and its texture is textbook-perfect;  moist and tender on the inside, crackling-crisp on the outside, with all the fat between the skin and meat rendered and with a perfect color to boost 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Duck for Dummies Recipe:
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Ingredients:
1 med size duck
Kosher salt to taste
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Method:
Pre-heat oven to 400F
Prick skin and fat of duck all over, remove excess fat-flaps
Season duck generously inside and out side with the salt.
Place duck breast-side down on a wire rack which rests on a sheet-pan.
Place into oven, immediately turn temperature down to 300 F
Roast duck for 3 hours and 45 minutes, turning duck every 30 minutes
After 3 hours and 45 minutes, increase heat to 420F, roast duck breast side up until skin is very crisp and golden, about 20 to 30 minutes.
Let duck rest for 10 minutes before carving.
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Click here for more  Duck  on  ChefsOpinion
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Duck For Dummies

Duck For Dummies

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Duck For Dummies

Duck For Dummies

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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