Swabia

Breakfast of Champions # 73 – Schwäbisches Bauernfrühstück ( Swabian Farmers Breakfast )

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Farmers Breakfast

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If you wonder what constitutes a “Farmers Breakfast”, the answer is simple – anything that farmers usually, or often, ate for breakfast.
Keep in mind that in times past, this more often than not was food which did not have to be bought in stores (there was little or no cash, people ate what their farm produced or what could be bartered in exchange for the farms products). It also had to be very substantial, because it was the meal that mostly gave you energy during the whole day, especially during harvest season, when the farmers left in the morning to tend the fields and/or the animals. These days mostly stretched from dusk ´til dawn, and the only other meal during that time would be a small vesper of bread, cheese, sausage, water, cider or wine and an apple or a pear.
So, bread or potatoes and some form of protein, such as homemade bacon, ham and/or sausage, eggs, milk, cheese and sometimes coffee was the standard. Also, very often a simple porridge of any grain with bread on the side had to suffice at least a few times a week.

One of the “Bauernfrühstück” which old-fashioned farts like myself still appreciate these days is the dish featured on this page. It can be done with any protein, meat or pickled fish. Fish, of course, would be likely for farmers (or fisherman) living close to the sea, where livestock was not as widespread as on farms which were situated further inland. And in case one is not a fan of “Blutwurst” (Whats wrong with you ??? 🙂 , one can substitute with liverwurst, which is the perfect substitute in my opinion), as well as beef hash, spam, or any other pate/sausage which disintegrates when heated.
This dish is so tasty that it features in many restaurants in Bavaria, Swabia and especially in Austria and Tirol, where its name is “Gröstl” (there, it is usually served with a fried egg on top). I personally prefer the eggs mixed-in, but hey – shoot me. 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Breakfast of Champions
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Click here for an entirely different  Bauernfrüstück on ChefsOpinion
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Breakfast of Champions # 75 – Schwäbisches Bauernfrühstück ( Swabian Farmers Breakfast )

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Breakfast of Champions # 75 – Schwäbisches Bauernfrühstück ( Swabian Farmers Breakfast )

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Breakfast of Champions # 75 – Schwäbisches Bauernfrühstück ( Swabian Farmers Breakfast )

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Breakfast of Champions # 75 – Schwäbisches Bauernfrühstück ( Swabian Farmers Breakfast )

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln- Spareribs With Sauerkraut And Sauteed Potatoes

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I will  not tell you how wonderful, tasty, scrumptious, delicious, ambrosial, appetizing, dainty, delectable, delish, flavorful, flavorsome, luscious, lush, mouth-watering, palatable, savory , sumptuous, succulent, tasteful, tasty, toothsome, toothy, yummy and just far-out super this dish is 🙂
Why not, you ask? Because, if you look at the pictures below and you don’t see it, words can’t help, and convincing won’t work 😦
For the ones who see, enjoy the pics and find the time to prepare this dish and you will find yourself superbly rewarded 🙂
Schälrippchen mit sauerkraut und bratkartoffeln is a typical dish from Swabia, the area in Southern Germany where I grew up. Typically eaten on a Saturday, it was looked upon as a very simple, down to earth dish, enjoyed only with family and not fancy enough to share with guests.
Schälrippchen mit sauerkraut und bratkartoffeln is one of those dishes which turn back the time for me, stimulating me to vividly remember times more simple and happy…….
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Guten Appetit !   Das Leben Ist Schön !
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All about  Spare Ribs
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More  Bratkartoffeln
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All about  Sauerkraut

Pictures of  Swabia
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P.S.
Traditionally, the brine for the ribs contains “Pökelsalz” which contains Nitrite and turns the ribs pinkish.
At home I use regular kosher salt instead, which will result in the same taste without the pink coloring of the meat.
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P.P.S.
This is food which tastes even better when re-heated 🙂
If you can manage, eat just a bit after just finished cooking, then bury the ribs in the sauerkraut, top with the potatoes and keep in the fridge overnight. The next day, gently reheat.
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Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln

Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln

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Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln

Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln

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Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln

Schälrippchen Mit Sauerkraut Und Bratkartoffeln

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Today’s  late lunch / early dinner has send me way back to my day’s of gluttony. I will have to live on apples for the next few days to make up for today’s culinary excess, but it was well worth it 🙂
After a few days of eating mostly fruits and vegetables, my cravings for some hearty soul food got the best of me and I gave in to my innermost desires of preparing and enjoying a beautiful “Choucroute Garnie”, also known in some parts of Swabia as “Kleine Schlachtplatte”.
(A “Kleine Schlachtplatte” consists of sauerkraut, boiled pig such as belly, loin, or knuckles, sausage such as blood pudding, fresh liverwurst or knackwurst and bread or potatoes – as opposed to a real  “Schlachtplatte”, which is eaten only on the day of butchering and processing a Hog and usually consists of sauerkraut, boiled pigs head or belly, fresh liverwurst and fresh blood pudding. Obviously, I had to make do with a “Kleine Schlachtplatte” today, which nevertheless was divine and deeply satisfying.
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Bon Appetit !   Live is Good !  (And sometimes fattening) 😦 🙂
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More on  Choucroute Garnie
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More on Schlachtplatte
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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Schwäbische Spätzle Mit Schmelze (Swabian Noodles)

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Swabian spaeztle with browned bread crumbs “.

One of the most common,simple, quick, delicious, economical and (in my biased eyes), one of the most beautiful dishes coming out of South Germany  (Swabia).
When I grew up, this was one of the more boring dishes for me and my brother Wilhelm to grace our dinner table, because it showed up with regularity a few times a week. Even today, spaetzle are one of the stables of south german cooking. But, alas, I have moved away from my homeland many decades ago, so now spaetzle have become a treat, truly enjoyed whenever possible.
Spaetzle are hard to come by even in German restaurants around here. This is probably due to the fact that more cooks in american German restaurants go by the name of Pepe instead of Fritz and have never seen real spaeztle, so what you mostly get are “Knoepfle”, not “Spaetzle”.
Knoepfle means little bottons, so they are a small spherical pasta, while spaetzle derives from “little spitz”, which means little penis. (Many folks believe spaetzle derives from the word spatz, which means sparrow and would makes no sense at all. Also, many Americans let their spaetzle or knoepfle brown while sauteeing, which is an absolute no no in Swabia!
So there you have it. One of the easiest and fastest pastas to make is actually difficult to come by (at least any good ones). Go figure 😦
But, there is hope ! Following is the recipe for original swabian spaetzle. Please note that there is no milk or water added, just AP flour, eggs and salt. In times past, when eggs where not as easily available and as affordable as now, folks have had to stretch the eggs by adding milk or even water. Today that is not necessary anymore, so just stick to flour,  eggs, and salt. With a little practice, it will take you less then 10 minutes to make about six portions.
Mix flour, salt, and eggs and beat the dough until it is elastic and forms large air bubbles. To shape the spaetzle, either use a “Spaetzle Brett” (spaeztle board) and a straight spatula, or, much easier, invest $ 20 and buy a “Spaetzle Press” online. If you are not so sure how to proceed with the dough and the shaping of the spaetzle, go online and check out one of the numerous good instructional videos ( But be aware, there is also a lot of crap online, so choose wisely ).

Fill the spaetzle press 3/4 with dough and press into boiling, salted water. After a minute or so the spaetzle will float at the surface. Remove to a bowl with cold water. Drain. To serve, saute in butter until hot, without allowing the spaetzle to brown. Top with “Schmelze”.

For the schmelze, melt butter and saute bread crumbs until golden.
(I like to use brown butter and add chives to my schmelze).

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Schwäbische Spätzle Mit Scmelze

Schwäbische Spätzle Mit Schmelze

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