Sauerkraut

Szegediner Gulasch (Székelykáposzta / Székelygulyás)

Szegediner Gulasch

Szegediner Gulasch


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Szegediner Gulasch  ( Krautgulasch) is a pork goulash (gulasch) prepared with sauerkraut and sour cream. It probably originated in the Austrian/ Vienna cuisine. (Pork is not typically used for goulash in classic Hungarian cuisine).
The Austrian/German name Szegediner Gulasch is probably misleading since the Hungarian name for the (Austrian) dish does not connect to the city of Szeged, but rather to the Hungarian writer  József Székely, who wrote favorable about this Viennese dish.
In Vienna, Szegediner Gulasch is usually served with serviettenknoedel, potatoes or rustic bread.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Goulash  on  ChefsOpinion
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Szegediner Gulasch

Szegediner Gulasch

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Szegediner Gulasch

Szegediner Gulasch

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Potato And Onion Pierogi With Grape Tomatoes And Cracked Black Pepper In Beurre Noisette


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Pierogi  or  Vareniki   are half circular dumplings of unleavened dough, stuffed (singularly or in various combinations) with mashed potatoes, cheese, farmer’s cheese, bryndza, cabbage, sauerkraut, meat, mushrooms, or other ingredients depending on the cook’s personal preferences. Dessert versions of the dumpling can be stuffed with a fresh fruit filling, such as cherry, strawberry, raspberry, blueberry, peach, or apple; stoned prunes are sometimes used.
Mashed potatoes mixed with farmer’s cheese and fried onions is a popular filling in Poland and Ukraine. In Poland this variety is called Ruskie pierogi. A popular filling for pierogi in Canada is mashed potatoes mixed with grated cheddar cheese .
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more info on  Pierogi,  Vareniki  and  Pelmeni
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Click here for a link to the above pictured   Pierogi  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for  Beurre Noisette
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P.S.
If the tiny black spots in the butter bother you, strain the beurre noisette after browning through a cheese cloth,  then  saute the veggies and the pierogies.
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Ingredients :

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Method :

Saute onion in butter until translucent.
Stir into the mashed potatoes, add grated cheese and yogurt,
season with salt and cayenne pepper, mix well.To make the dough, beat together the eggs and sour cream until smooth.
Sift together the flour, salt, and baking powder; stir into the sour cream mixture,
mix well and knead the dough on a lightly floured surface until firm and smooth.
Divide the dough in half, then roll out one half to 1/8 inch thickness.
Cut into 3 inch rounds using a cutter or drinking glass.Place a small spoonful of the mashed potato filling into the center of each round.
Moisten the edges with water, fold over, and press together with a fork to seal.
Repeat procedure with the remaining dough and filling.Cook in boiling saltwater until dough is done, about 4 to 5 minutes,
depending on the thickest part of the dough. Remove with a slotted spoon, drain.
Saute in butter, duck fat, chicken or pork schmaltz to your liking – soft without color, lightly browned or browned and crisp.
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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Powidl Mit Pfirsich (Plum Chutney With Peaches)

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Here is another delicious plum recipe I want to share with y’all 🙂
Powidl has its origin in Poland (powidła or powidło) and the Czech republic (povidla), from where it went on to Austria and Germany and other European countries.
Powidl was traditionally made without additional sweeteners or gelling agents and was mostly eaten as a spread on bread and cakes. It is comparable in appearance and texture to Indian spicy plum chutney, although as the name implies, the Indian version is chock-full of spices and seasoning and more suitable as accompaniment to meat dishes.
After the war, there was very little money to go around in a typical German household, especially in the countryside and even when there was, the selection of commercially prepared foods  was very limited. However, although my parents were no farmers, we owned a small amount of land with fruit trees on them, mainly apples and plums. As I described in previous posts, most of the fruits and vegetables from our land and garden were preserved to last well into the winter. With the help of our neighbors, my mom prepared our own pickles, sauerkraut, marmalade, apple sauce, etc, while most of the apples went to the communal  “Mosterei” to make our own cider.
However, when Powidl was made, the best way to enjoy it was to eat it fresh, while still warm and fragrant. A slice of home-made bread (baked in the communal oven by my best friends mom, Frau Vetter), slathered with fresh butter and heavenly Powidl – provided my very first culinary happy moments at age 6 :-). In order to put this into perspective – buttered bread with sugar sprinkled on top was a special treat, so the sweet, beautifully vibrant Powidl added a whole new dimension to a simple slice of bread. Like I said before, for a few years after the war,  Germany was not a place of culinary indulgence for most folks.
Well, back to the delicacy at hand; The plums I used were a bit on the tart side, so I added a small amount of sugar and honey to round out the taste. The peaches ended up in this Powidl because they had a few blemishes and therefore did not appeal to me in their raw state.
So, in the end, not a particular original Powidl – but nevertheless, a super delicious Powidl indeed 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for   Indian Spiced Plum Chutney  (Alloo Bukharay Ki Chutney)
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Powidl Mit Pfirsich  (Plum Chutney With Peaches)

Powidl Mit Pfirsich (Plum Chutney With Peaches)

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Vanilla Ice cream With Powidl , Whipped Cream And Sweet Plum Sauce

Vanilla Ice cream With Powidl , Whipped Cream And Sweet Plum Sauce

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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The >OTHER< Kraut

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Bayerisches Kraut  (Bavarian Cabbage) is the lesser known cousin of  Sauerkraut. Also made of shredded white cabbage, it is prepared from fresh, (not fermented) cabbage and its main characteristic is the inclusion of caramelized sugar and caraway seeds, which gives the dish its distinctive flavor and color. In my opinion, the only reason  Bayerisches Kraut  is not as popular as Sauerkraut stems from the fact that you can’t buy cabbage ready-sliced and therefore the extra work to do that prevents most home cooks to prepare this great dish. But let me assure you, the few minutes it takes to slice the cabbage are well worth the trouble and you will be rewarded with an extraordinary, flavorful dish which pair’s great with pork and game dishes.
Today I served my  Bayerisches Kraut  with  Eisbein, another one of my  “can’t live without it  ”  favorites 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for another version of Bayerisches Kraut
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Click here for Krautsalat (German Cabbage Slaw)
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Click here for German/Vietnamese Cabbage Rolls
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Click here for Sauerkraut on ChefsOpinion
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P.S.
As one reader has pointed out (thank you Sherry), you CAN get shredded cabbage at the supermarket. However, it is usually shredded very fine and therefore NOT suitable for Bayerisches Kraut.
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Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

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Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

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Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

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Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

Eisbein Mit Bayerischem Kraut, Senf & Meerrettich

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Today’s  late lunch / early dinner has send me way back to my day’s of gluttony. I will have to live on apples for the next few days to make up for today’s culinary excess, but it was well worth it 🙂
After a few days of eating mostly fruits and vegetables, my cravings for some hearty soul food got the best of me and I gave in to my innermost desires of preparing and enjoying a beautiful “Choucroute Garnie”, also known in some parts of Swabia as “Kleine Schlachtplatte”.
(A “Kleine Schlachtplatte” consists of sauerkraut, boiled pig such as belly, loin, or knuckles, sausage such as blood pudding, fresh liverwurst or knackwurst and bread or potatoes – as opposed to a real  “Schlachtplatte”, which is eaten only on the day of butchering and processing a Hog and usually consists of sauerkraut, boiled pigs head or belly, fresh liverwurst and fresh blood pudding. Obviously, I had to make do with a “Kleine Schlachtplatte” today, which nevertheless was divine and deeply satisfying.
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Bon Appetit !   Live is Good !  (And sometimes fattening) 😦 🙂
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More on  Choucroute Garnie
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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Hans’ Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

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Here  you see  the  lunch I enjoyed today, which must be one of the most satisfying sandwiches I have ever prepared  (Or maybe I was just very hungry).
In any case, I had these ingredients at home and just put together what I found in the fridge and in the larder.
However, in the future I will go out and buy these ingredients on purpose in order to recreate this lovely beast 🙂

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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Hans' Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

Hans’ Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

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Hans' Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

Hans’ Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

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Preparation :
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toast two halves of a ciabatta roll, cover the inside of one half with mustard

toast two halves of a ciabatta roll, cover the inside of one half with mustard

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cover the other half with grated horseradish

cover the other half with grated horseradish

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top with fine quality, cooked sauerkraut

top with fine quality, cooked sauerkraut

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top with finely sliced pastrami

top with finely sliced pastrami

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drizzle with french cocktail sauce (mayo, ketchup, cognac, horseradish)

drizzle with french cocktail sauce (mayo, ketchup, cognac, horseradish)

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top with the other half of the ciabatta, slice in half

top with the other half of the ciabatta, slice in half

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Hans' Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

Hans’ Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

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Hans' Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

Hans’ Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

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Hans' Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

Hans’ Pastrami & Sauerkraut On Chiabata

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Bayrisches Kraut, Geräucherte Schweinehaxen Und Petersilien – Kartoffeln

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Cabbage  is one of the most used vegetables, yet these day’s it has a less than stellar reputation. In my opinion the reason for this is that most cooks in this part of the world have no clue what to do with it, except maybe coleslaw or the crappy so called “Sauerkraut” they put on even crappier hot dogs. ( However, a  properly prepared sauerkraut can be culinary heaven.
On the other hand, in Asia and Europe, all types of cabbage are highly valued players in a myriad of recipes were cabbage is either the main ingredient or one of many ingredients in a dish.
One of my favorite cabbage dishes is “Bayerishes Kraut”, (cabbage bavarian style).
It is very simple to prepare, yet it’s very tasty and unusual in its texture and flavors. The secret is to plan ahead and cook the cabbage one day before consumption, then reheating it after one day in the fridge. (Same goes for sauerkraut)
Served with smoked pork knuckles and sauteed parsley potatoes – aaaahhhhhh 🙂

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Bayerisches Kraut, Geraucherte Schweinehaxen Und Petersilie- Kartoffeln

Bayerisches Kraut, Geraucherte Schweinehaxen Und Petersilien – Kartoffeln

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simmer smoked pork knuckles inwater seasoned with kosher salt and plenty of garlic, chili flakes

simmer smoked pork knuckles in water seasoned with kosher salt and plenty of garlic and chili flakes

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Saute peanut oil and sugaruntil sugar  turns light brown. Add salami (or bacon) and onions, deglace with white wine

Saute peanut oil and sugar until sugar turns light brown. Add salami (or bacon) and onions, deglaze with white wine

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add white vinegar of your choice,

add white vinegar of your choice,


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add some of the stock from the knuckles

add some of the stock from the knuckles


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add finely sliced white cabbage, bay leaves and caraway seeds

add finely sliced white cabbage, bay leaves and caraway seeds

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mix well, let simmer for approximately 20 minutes

mix well, let simmer for approximately 20 minutes

after 20 minutes there should be very little liquid left. Add a small amount of corn starch slurry, simmer one more minutes

after 20 minutes there should be very little liquid left. Add a small amount of corn starch slurry, simmer one more minutes

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Once the pork knuckles are very tender without falling apart, remove from stock and bury in the cabbage. Let cool and store overnight in fridge. Next day, reheat and serve with sauteed parsley potatoes. Serve with mustard and horseradish

Once the pork knuckles are very tender without falling apart, remove from stock and bury in the cabbage. Let cool and store overnight in fridge. Next day, reheat and serve with sauteed parsley potatoes. Serve with mustard and horseradish

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Bayerisches Kraut, Geraucherte Schweinehaxen Und Petersilie- Kartoffeln

Bayerisches Kraut, Geraucherte Schweinehaxen Und Petersilien- Kartoffeln

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Smoked Pork Knuckles, Bavarian Style Cabbage & Sauteed Parsley Potatoes

Smoked Pork Knuckles, Bavarian Style Cabbage & sautéed Parsley Potatoes

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Smoked Pork Knuckles, Bavarian Style Cabbage & Sauteed Parsley Potatoes

Smoked Pork Knuckles, Bavarian Style Cabbage & Sauteed Parsley Potatoes

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