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Lobster-Balls And Mung Bean-Noodles Soup

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What  can you do with two small lobster tails ? Well, you could broil them, saute them, grill them, bake them, or you could chop them up.
Now, if you ask yourself what moron would chop up perfectly good lobster tails into a paste, you probably never had a good lobster ball soup. I guess the reason that we don’t see lobster balls in western cuisine (besides the occasional  Lobster Quenelle ) is that we want to see the big bang for the money and lobster balls can’t really compete with the splendor of whole lobster tails strutting their stuff.  But the taste and the texture of lobster balls is something else altogether. Silky-smooth in texture, with the pure taste of sweet fresh lobster, it is a delicacy you should not miss! The preparation is super-easy and can be done successfully even if you are not very experienced in the kitchen. So, next time you purchase a couple of lobster tails, you might want to widen your culinary horizon with this superb dish.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Lobsterballs And Mung Bean-Noodles Soup

Lobster-Balls And Mung Bean-Noodles Soup

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Lobster-Balls And Mung Bean-Noodles Soup

Lobsterballs And Mung Bean-Noodles Soup

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Lobster Balls Recipe:
4 oz lobster meat, shredded
4 oz lobster meat, chopped fine into paste
1 ea egg white
1 tblsp coarse chopped yellow corn or 1 tblsp coarse chopped water chestnuts (for texture)
Salt and pepper to taste
Mix lobster-paste, egg white, chopped corn, salt and pepper until well mixed, then add shredded lobster, mix. Shape into 10 to 15 balls, simmer in soup until done, about 4 minutes. Serve at once.
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For the soup I used vegetable stock. Substitute with chicken stock or seafood stock if you prefer.
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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
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Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Today’s  late lunch / early dinner has send me way back to my day’s of gluttony. I will have to live on apples for the next few days to make up for today’s culinary excess, but it was well worth it 🙂
After a few days of eating mostly fruits and vegetables, my cravings for some hearty soul food got the best of me and I gave in to my innermost desires of preparing and enjoying a beautiful “Choucroute Garnie”, also known in some parts of Swabia as “Kleine Schlachtplatte”.
(A “Kleine Schlachtplatte” consists of sauerkraut, boiled pig such as belly, loin, or knuckles, sausage such as blood pudding, fresh liverwurst or knackwurst and bread or potatoes – as opposed to a real  “Schlachtplatte”, which is eaten only on the day of butchering and processing a Hog and usually consists of sauerkraut, boiled pigs head or belly, fresh liverwurst and fresh blood pudding. Obviously, I had to make do with a “Kleine Schlachtplatte” today, which nevertheless was divine and deeply satisfying.
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Bon Appetit !   Live is Good !  (And sometimes fattening) 😦 🙂
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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Choucroute Garnie  (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

Choucroute Garnie (Kleine Schlachtplatte)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pied De Cochon

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ANYTHING  sounds better in french ?! 🙂
I used to call my wife “Mon Petit Chou”, which sounds perfectly sweet and romantic in french. Translated, it’s “My Little Cabbage” :-(. Not as sweet and romantic, no doubt.
Same with my dinner today : “Pied De Cochon – which translates into “Pig’s Trotters”, one of my all time favorite second cuts.
Pigs trotters are very versatile, they are great fried, steamed, braised, and pickled.
The following dish was created today in my kitchen and, I must say, it was absolutely delicious (and pretty to look at, to boost).
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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More “Pig’s Goodies” on ChefsOpinion
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Wiki on Pigs Trotters
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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Beef , Shiitake And Mung Bean Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

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Here  you have one of these dishes were you can have a meal fit for a king with a minimum effort of labor and a very reasonable cost of ingredients.
Just plan ahead and either cook the beef the day before you want to eat the soup, or, if you want to have it for dinner after work, start the beef and it’s broth as soon as you get up in the morning. Bring it to a simmer, let it cook for as long as you can before you leave the house, then just let the beef cool in the broth until you get home. Also at that point, soak the shiitake in some of the hot broth during the day. From there it will only take another 10 minutes to finish this sexy beauty (the time to cook the noodles) and voilà ! –  ready for a soup as good (or better) as you can get in your favorite noodle-house. 🙂

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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Beef , Shiitake And and Mung Bean Noodles In Ginger.Garlic Broth

Beef , Shiitake And Mung Bean Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

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Beef , Shiitake And and Mung Bean Noodles In Ginger.Garlic Broth

Beef , Shiitake And Mung Bean Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

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Preparation :
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To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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” Collard Greens & Smoked Neck Bones “

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We  southerner’s sure love our greens .
(Southern Germany in my case, that’s why the
roast potatoes instead of the corn bread)    🙂

I cooked a great amount of pork so at the end there
was a good amount of  potlikker  left which I froze.
Next time I’ll go to the store I will buy kale to make
a great Caldo Verde with the leftover potlikker.

All about  Collard Greens
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Ingredient’s :

Collard greens, each leaf washed individually,
– stem removed, cut into 2″ strips
Smoked pork neck bones,
Onions,  sliced
Garlic,  paste
Rendered pork fat,  (schmalz)
– substitute with chicken or duck fat if you prefer
Kosher salt,
Black pepper,  freshly ground
Maggi seasoning,
Scotch bonnet,  for a little kick

Method :

Simmer smoked pork in lightly salted water until almost tender.
Meanwhile, saute onions and garlic in your fat of choice until
onions are translucent and garlic fragrant. Add to the simmering
pork. When pork is almost tender, add the greens and seasoning
and cook until greens are tender. Depending on the season, this
can take anywhere from 45 minutes to two hours.
(I cooked those greens for two more hours and the pork and greens
were just perfect. Adjust the seasoning before you serve.
As I mentioned, traditionally in the american south you
would  serve this with corn bread. However, around the world
different customs call for different sidings, from potatoes to rice
to just a hearty slice of bread to soak up the potlikker. You might
also want to try to sprinkle some parmigiano  reggiano over the top,
which I did with my re-heated left overs. Another knock-out   🙂

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good ! 
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