steamed

“Pigs Trotters” (Part 1 – Caribbean Souse)


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Pig’s feet  are not everybody’s cup of tea, but for those of us who love them, they are a special treat.
I prepare them quite often, in stews, steamed, braised, Asian style, Latin style, German style; any which way is fine with me 🙂
The following dish is Caribbean Style Souse, as I enjoyed it many moon’s ago a couple of times in Trinidad, at the home of my friend Lyron’s mother.
Very spicy and lightly acidic, with lots of vegetables, it was the perfect food on a hot day by the beach, spend in wonderful company and washed down with a few bottles of Carib Beer – nothing else was needed in those moments to feel happy and content 🙂
These meals (and times) are now in the distant past; all that’s left are the happy memories, vividly recalled by preparing the meals we enjoyed together then – Lyron and his wife Dorsey, my wife Maria, myself and Lyron’s mother, whose name eludes me after all these years but whom I always remember when preparing this particular souse………….
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !

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Click here for Escabeche  on  ChefsOpinion

Click here for more  Souse  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for more  Pigs Feet/Pigs Trotters  on  ChefsOpinion
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“Pigs Trotters” (Part 1 – Caribbean Souse)

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“Pigs Trotters” (Part 1 – Caribbean Souse)

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“Pigs Trotters” (Part 1 – Caribbean Souse)

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Caribbean Souse

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures:
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Pig’s Feet Souse ( Love It Or Hate It )

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Pig’s feet  are not everybody’s cup of tea, but for those of us who love them, they are a special treat.
I prepare them quite often, in stews, steamed, braised, Asian style, Latin style, German style; any way is fine with me 🙂
The following dish is Caribbean Style Souse, as I enjoyed it many moon’s ago a couple of times in Trinidad, at the home of my friend Lyron’s mother.
Very spicy and lightly acidic, with lots of vegetables, it was the perfect food on a hot day by the beach, spend in wonderful company and washed down with a few bottles of Carib Beer – nothing else was needed in those moments to feel happy and content 🙂
These meals (and times) are now in the distant past; all that’s left are the happy memories, vividly recalled by preparing the meals we enjoyed together then – Lyron and his wife Dorsey, my wife Maria, myself and Lyron’s mother, whose name eludes me after all these years but whom I always remember when preparing this particular souse………….
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Souse  on  Chefsopinion
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Click here for  Escabeche  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for more  Pigs Feet  on  ChefsOpinion
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Pig's Feet Souse

Pig’s Feet Souse

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Pig's Feet Souse

Pig’s Feet Souse

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Pig's Feet Souse

Pig’s Feet Souse

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pied De Cochon

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ANYTHING  sounds better in french ?! 🙂
I used to call my wife “Mon Petit Chou”, which sounds perfectly sweet and romantic in french. Translated, it’s “My Little Cabbage” :-(. Not as sweet and romantic, no doubt.
Same with my dinner today : “Pied De Cochon – which translates into “Pig’s Trotters”, one of my all time favorite second cuts.
Pigs trotters are very versatile, they are great fried, steamed, braised, and pickled.
The following dish was created today in my kitchen and, I must say, it was absolutely delicious (and pretty to look at, to boost).
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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More “Pig’s Goodies” on ChefsOpinion
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Wiki on Pigs Trotters
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More about Pigs Trotters
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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

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While  I love large sauteed scallops, my budget sometimes dictates my menu. So when I was thinking of getting some giant diverscallops for lunch today, I almost fainted when I saw the price ($ 46.00)
So I went for the next best thing, bay scallops. ( $ 16.00) Now here is the thing: When we think of scallops, we usually think of the beautiful pictures of seard scallops with their golden crust and juicy, opaque center. I don’t suggest you try this with tiny bay scallops, which are much more suited for breading or steaming. I wanted to enjoy the pure taste of the scallops, so I gently steamed them with some vegetables in white wine and butter. Absolutely delicious and easy and quick to prepare.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

P.S.
Instead of eating them with a fork, use a spoon so you don’t miss out on the great sauce 🙂

Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

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Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

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Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

Steamed Bay Scallops, Peppers And Green Peas

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please be so kind and click on the video on the bottom of this page.  Thank you 🙂
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Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

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Today’s  early dinner was so delicious, easy and fast to prepare. I now get my dumpling and bun dough fresh from my Chinese neighborhood restaurant, so dumplings and steamed buns are much more often to be found on my dinner table. To prep the stuffing only takes a few minutes, steaming the buns another 20 minutes or so. Great food in a snap 🙂
The stuffing for these buns was ground pork, finely chopped white cabbage, sesame oil, egg white, salt, pepper, garlic paste and grated ginger. Stuff the buns, arrange on oiled paper sheets in steamer, steam for twenty minutes and – bingo !

Bon Appetit !   Life is good !
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Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi),  Sriracha, Wasabi

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Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

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Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

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Beautiful Charger

Beautiful Charger

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Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi)

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Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi),  drizzled with dipping sauce  ( soy sauce, garlic paste, lime juice, chili oil)

Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi),
drizzled with dipping sauce
( soy sauce, garlic paste, lime juice, chili oil)

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Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog, please be so kind and click on the video on the bottom of this page.
(You don’t have to watch it, just click once)   Thank you 🙂
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Boiled Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

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Boiled  dumplings are one of the more common daily food items in Chinese cuisine. Yet, while most dumplings served in restaurants are steamed, the more common cooking method in private homes is boiling them in salted water.
These dumplings are very easy to make and take no time at all, especially if you use ready-made won ton skin’s.
However, tonight I used regular pasta dough (all-purpose flour, whole eggs, water and salt), which I rolled very thin and cut with a round cutter into even shapes) Add a stuffing of half minced pork and half minced shrimp with finely sliced scallions, grated ginger, garlic paste, sesame oil , soy sauce and cayenne pepper. Wet the edges of the dumplings with a wet finger, fold them over and press lightly. Boil in salted water until stuffing is cooked through, about 2 minutes. Remove to a bowl and toss with sesame oil and chili oil. To serve, sprinkle with chopped fresh coriander and a dipping sauce made of soy sauce, lime juice , sugar and chili flakes.

Bon Appetit !   Live is Good !

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Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

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Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

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Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

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Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

Pork And Shrimp Dumplings

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boiling pork and shrimp dumplings

boiling pork and shrimp dumplings

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Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog, please be so kind and click on the video on the bottom of this page.
(You don’t have to watch it, just click once)   Thank you 🙂
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” Braised Pork Ribs With Fermented Black Bean Sauce “

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Today I wanted to use my newly purchased glass cooking vessel, “guaranteed stove top save”
Well, it might have been be save from talking or painting or other such mundane undertakings, but it certainly was not save from exploding into a thousand pieces.
So much for ” guaranteed warranties ” . ( Kind of like the promises of our politician’s ).
Any way, after I cleaned up the mess and calmed Bella down, I proceeded to cook dinner the old fashion way, on the stove top in a rigged metal steamer.
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Braised pork ribs with fermented black bean sauce & rice.
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Ingredients
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Pork ribs,
Scallion,
Onion
Chilis,
Ginger,
Garlic
Cilantro
Soy sauce,
Fermented black bean sauce
Scotch bonnet hot sauce
Sesame oil
Water or unsalted stock

Method :

In
a steamer (or makeshift steamer)put all ingredients except
half the cilantro you are using in the bottom of the steamer.
Add a wire rack, place ribs on top and cover air tight.
Steam for one hour or until ribs are tender.
Remove ribs and set aside. Strain sauce and brush both sides of ribs.
Put ribs back on rack on a clean baking tray and bake in oven until
nicely glazed, repeatedly adding more sauce as needed.
To serve, nape with remaining sauce and sprinkle with
cilantro and some more chilis.


Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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