soup

Pork Sinigang (Sinigang na Baboy)

Yesterday  I had a long-standing wish fulfilled 🙂
(Mind you, there are “BIG WISHES” in life and then there are “small wishes” This was a small wish, but nevertheless, I am happy that it finally came through)
For years, I wished there’d be a good Filipino restaurant in my neighborhood, but there is only one that I know of within a few miles around, and frankly, that one sucks!
I don’t want to go into details, but believe me, if it would be halfway decent I would still go there. I have tried it three times, but all three times it was VERY disappointing, so I stopped going there and gave up hope. Whenever I needed a Pinoy food-fix, I had to prepare it myself.
So yesterday I went to do some errands in a close-by shopping center to which I have been going for more than 15 years. Much to my surprise, I saw a “new” restaurant named Manila Grill&BBQ  tucked away in a corner. (I asked an employee how long they’ve been open and he said more than two years)
I had never noticed it before, maybe because what sticks out on the sign is  Grill & BBQ,  so one does not quickly associate this with Pinoy food………..
The place is very clean, simply but nicely appointed and the employees are very friendly, attentive and professional.
The food, THE FOOD 🙂 – it was absolutely delightful, very authentic, nicely presented and wonderfully tasty. The prices are moderate and overall, it was one of the best lunch experiences I had in any restaurant in Miami in years.
You can read more about it here: Manila Grill & BBQ, Pembroke Pines, Florida
So now, back to the dish at hand,  Sinigang Na Baboy
Sinigang is a sour soup native to the Philippines. Beef, pork, shrimp, fish, and even chicken (sinampalukang manok) can be used. The one featured here today uses pork as the main ingredient. One can use boneless pork, though bony parts of the pig known as “buto-buto” are usually preferred. Neck bones, spare ribs, baby back ribs, and pork belly all can be used.
The most common vegetables used are egglant, okra, onion, green beans, tomato and taro root.
The most common souring agent is tamarind juice, (sampalog), but if not available, you can use calamansi, lime, lemon,  guava, bilimbi (kamias), green mango, pineapple, and wild mangosteen (santol) To go an even easier route, you can buy instant “Sinigang Mix” ready to add to the stock while cooking. (For my personal taste this is too salty and not sour enough)
Today I went to look-up the sinigang I posted before on ChefsOpinion, but much to my surprise I could not find a single post, although I cook sinigang quite often. I then checked my folder of unpublished posts and low and behold, there was a bunch of pics of a sinigang I cooked about 6 years ago but never published. Looking at the quality of the pics I understand why I hesitated, but what the heck, here it is:
Sinigang na baboy from the distant past 🙂
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Masaya Ang Buhay !   Kainan Na !
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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Preparation :
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Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup Recipe # 1001

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Chicken-noodle soup is probably the most unglamorous yet also one of the universally most loved dishes. Who doesn’t remember the comforting warmth it provided when ones Mom utilized it for that all-curing remedy (along with Vicks’VapoRub) during childhood and later as a grown-up the go-to comfort dish that made everything feel good again ? 🙂
As for me, no week goes by without chicken noodle soup showing up at least once, sometimes twice. If I prepare it for guests, I usually make a boneless version. For myself (and Bella), I always prepare the soup with bone-in chicken. For me, holding a leg or drumstick or wing in my hand and pulling the meat off with my teeth is a big part of the pleasure of eating chicken noodle soup. Here now is the version I had for today’s lunch……
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Chicken Soup  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for more  Soup  on  ChefsOpinion
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Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup - Recipe # 1001

Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup – Recipe # 1001

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Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup - Recipe # 1001

Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup – Recipe # 1001

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Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup - Recipe # 1001

Chicken, Noodle & Vegetable Soup – Recipe # 1001

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Preparation :
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Spinach, Potato & Garlic Cream Soup

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Here  now is a top-candidate for easiest to prepare comfort food of the month 🙂
– Actual prep time – less than 5 minutes.
– Total time from start to finish – 25 minutes max.
– Gratification – immense 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Spinach, Potato & Garlic Cream Soup

Spinach, Potato & Garlic Cream Soup

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Spinach, Potato & Garlic Cream Soup

Spinach, Potato & Garlic Cream Soup

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Preparation :
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Executioners Stew

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Of  course you will wonder what possessed me to name this stew Executioners Stew – well, my thinking goes that if I would have one last meal before the executioner would step in, this would be the last supper I would request. While there are many things I would like to have for that macabre occasion, this one combines five of my favorite foods in one single dish :
Soup, chili-peppers, chicken-gizzards, pigs-feet and ox-tripe.
Certainly not worth dying for, but as a last supper – yes sir, please !
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Anyway, here is to many more years of living the Good Life 🙂
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Link to  Green Sofrito Recipe
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All about  Sofrito
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Link to  Pa Amb Tomà Quet (Tomato Bread)
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Executioners Stew With "Pa Amb Tomà Quet"

Executioners Stew With “Pa Amb Tomà Quet”

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Executioners Stew With "Pa Amb Tomà Quet"

Executioners Stew With “Pa Amb Tomà Quet”

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Preparation :
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Short Ribs, Bok Choy, Shiitake And Noodles In Spicy Ginger/Garlic Broth

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Soup!  – God’s gift to comfort food 🙂
I wonder how many different soups I have eaten in my life and how many different noodle soups in particular. And still, I never get tired of preparing and eating yet another version of this wonderful food category. Soup, to me,  never get’s old. To the contrary, I can never get enough of it, be it cream soup, purred soup, clear soup, soup made of meat, seafood, vegetables, fruit or any combination thereof, hot or cold. So without further ado, here is my latest concoction:
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Bon Appetit !   Life is good !
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Short Ribs, Bok Choy, Shiitake And Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

Short Ribs, Bok Choy, Shiitake And Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

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Short Ribs, Bok Choy, Shiitake And Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

Short Ribs, Bok Choy, Shiitake And Noodles In Ginger/Garlic Broth

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Preparation :
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Carlo’s Veal & Leek Soup

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Soup……….
(Excerpt from “FoodTimeline”)
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Food historians tell us the history of soup is probably as old as the history of cooking. The act of combining various ingredients in a large pot to create a nutritious, filling, easily digested, simple to make/serve food was inevitable. This made it the perfect choice for both sedentary and travelling cultures, rich and poor, healthy people and invalids. Soup (and stews, pottages, porridges, gruels, etc.) evolved according to local ingredients and tastes. New England chowder, Spanish gazpacho, Russian borscht, Italian minestrone, French onion, Chinese won ton and Campbell’s tomato…are all variations on the same theme.
Soups were easily digested and were prescribed for invalids since ancient times. The modern restaurant industry is said to be based on soup. Restoratifs (wheron the word “restaurant” comes) were the first items served in public restaurants in 18th century Paris. Broth [Pot-au-feu], bouillion, and consomme entered here. Classic French cuisine generated many of the soups we……read more about  Soup  here
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Many years ago when Maria and I visited one of my friends in Germany, Carlo (better known in Germany’s food community as  “Kräuter-Carlo” aus Trebenow), served us this great soup which has stayed in my repertoire for home cooked comfort food ever since. It is so tasty and the texture so pleasant that every time I prepare a large pot full in order to be able to re-heat it in batches in the next few days, I usually end up finishing most of the whole pot right then and there :-).
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Carlo's Pork & Leek Soup

Carlo’s Veal & Leek Soup

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Carlo's Veal & Leek Soup

Carlo’s Pork & Leek Soup

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Preparation :
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Pied De Cochon

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ANYTHING  sounds better in french ?! 🙂
I used to call my wife “Mon Petit Chou”, which sounds perfectly sweet and romantic in french. Translated, it’s “My Little Cabbage” :-(. Not as sweet and romantic, no doubt.
Same with my dinner today : “Pied De Cochon – which translates into “Pig’s Trotters”, one of my all time favorite second cuts.
Pigs trotters are very versatile, they are great fried, steamed, braised, and pickled.
The following dish was created today in my kitchen and, I must say, it was absolutely delicious (and pretty to look at, to boost).
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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More “Pig’s Goodies” on ChefsOpinion
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Wiki on Pigs Trotters
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More about Pigs Trotters
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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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Preparation :
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Creamy Potato And Carrot Soup With Salami And Shrimp

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A bowl  full of this delicious beauty should make you feel good and happy any time of the year, any time of the day.
If for any reason you don’t want to use heavy cream for the ultimate silkiness, you can substitute the cream with tofu and still get great results 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Creamy Potato And Carrot Soup With Salami And Shrimp

Creamy Potato And Carrot Soup With Salami And Shrimp

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Creamy Potato And Carrot Soup With Salami And Shrimp

Creamy Potato And Carrot Soup With Salami And Shrimp

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Preparation :
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Shrimp And Lap Cheong Fried Rice

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Leftover rice –
soup, congee or fried rice ? – that was the question ! 🙂
Well, this time the decision came easy because I also had a few slices of cooked ham and a few small shrimp in my fridge, along with some peppers and fresh eggs. And besides, I’ll have a good fried rice anytime 🙂
This version is very simple and only takes a couple of minutes to prep and execute. Just make sure you use day-old rice – fresh cooked rice is too moist and will not result in good fried rice !
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Bon Appetit !   Live is Good !
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Shrimp And Lap Chea Fried Rice

Shrimp And Lap Cheong Fried Rice

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Shrimp And Lap Chea Fried Rice

Shrimp And Lap Cheong Fried Rice

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Preparation :
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Red Beet Delight

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Link to :  “Hans’ Lighter, Healthier Comfort Food”
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Like  most kid’s, when I was little I used to hate vegetables. One of my favorites in the hate department were red beets. Mom used to make a salad with them, so that salad combined the TWO most hated food stuffs – beets and onions :-(.
My Mom used to bribe me sometimes (When my dad didn’t catch it) with 10 pfennig, or about a nickel, to eat the onions, which I otherwise sorted out and pushed to the side 🙂
Of course, things have changed, like so many other Issues ( I went from skinny to fat, from handsome to rugged?, from long-haired to bald and from a vegetable hater to a vegetable lover) 🙂
I have prepared red beet soup for many years, but as it is tradition, I usually included a (un)- healthy dose of heavy cream to lighten the color and to smoothen the texture. Not this time. This beauty is pure red beets, liquefied with vegetable stock and enriched with a topping of steamed broccoli and a bit of Greek yogurt.
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Bon Appetit !    Life is Good !
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Red Beet Delight

Red Beet Delight


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Red Beet Delight

Red Beet Delight


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Preparation :
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