green beans

Pork Sinigang (Sinigang na Baboy)

Yesterday  I had a long-standing wish fulfilled 🙂
(Mind you, there are “BIG WISHES” in life and then there are “small wishes” This was a small wish, but nevertheless, I am happy that it finally came through)
For years, I wished there’d be a good Filipino restaurant in my neighborhood, but there is only one that I know of within a few miles around, and frankly, that one sucks!
I don’t want to go into details, but believe me, if it would be halfway decent I would still go there. I have tried it three times, but all three times it was VERY disappointing, so I stopped going there and gave up hope. Whenever I needed a Pinoy food-fix, I had to prepare it myself.
So yesterday I went to do some errands in a close-by shopping center to which I have been going for more than 15 years. Much to my surprise, I saw a “new” restaurant named Manila Grill&BBQ  tucked away in a corner. (I asked an employee how long they’ve been open and he said more than two years)
I had never noticed it before, maybe because what sticks out on the sign is  Grill & BBQ,  so one does not quickly associate this with Pinoy food………..
The place is very clean, simply but nicely appointed and the employees are very friendly, attentive and professional.
The food, THE FOOD 🙂 – it was absolutely delightful, very authentic, nicely presented and wonderfully tasty. The prices are moderate and overall, it was one of the best lunch experiences I had in any restaurant in Miami in years.
You can read more about it here: Manila Grill & BBQ, Pembroke Pines, Florida
So now, back to the dish at hand,  Sinigang Na Baboy
Sinigang is a sour soup native to the Philippines. Beef, pork, shrimp, fish, and even chicken (sinampalukang manok) can be used. The one featured here today uses pork as the main ingredient. One can use boneless pork, though bony parts of the pig known as “buto-buto” are usually preferred. Neck bones, spare ribs, baby back ribs, and pork belly all can be used.
The most common vegetables used are egglant, okra, onion, green beans, tomato and taro root.
The most common souring agent is tamarind juice, (sampalog), but if not available, you can use calamansi, lime, lemon,  guava, bilimbi (kamias), green mango, pineapple, and wild mangosteen (santol) To go an even easier route, you can buy instant “Sinigang Mix” ready to add to the stock while cooking. (For my personal taste this is too salty and not sour enough)
Today I went to look-up the sinigang I posted before on ChefsOpinion, but much to my surprise I could not find a single post, although I cook sinigang quite often. I then checked my folder of unpublished posts and low and behold, there was a bunch of pics of a sinigang I cooked about 6 years ago but never published. Looking at the quality of the pics I understand why I hesitated, but what the heck, here it is:
Sinigang na baboy from the distant past 🙂
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Masaya Ang Buhay !   Kainan Na !
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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Sinigang Na Baboy  (Pork Sinigang)

Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Bratwurstsalat (Brat-Salad)

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Today  I found  some great German (almost) bratwurst at my grocer’s. Good looking, fresh and at $6.00 bucks for a pack of five, who could say no…..
At first I wanted to prepare them in the typical German style, sautéed or grilled whole, served with a leaf salad, potato salad and mustard on the side. But then I realized that I am more in the mood for a big bowl of composed salad, so this rustic beauty is what resulted.
Verdict : Prepared this way is much better than served the traditional way 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more Sausage  on  Chefsopinion
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Click here for more German Dishes  on  ChefsOpinion
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Bratwurstsalat  (Brat-Salad)
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Bratwurstsalat  (Brat-Salad)

Bratwurstsalat (Brat-Salad)

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Bratwurstsalat  (Brat-Salad)

Bratwurstsalat (Brat-Salad)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic/Ginger Broth

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Usually  we use this cut of the animal to make Osso Buco (originally done with veal shanks), but I love me a hearty soup more than anything else, so I decided to prepare this dish with some pork shanks my friend Curtis dropped off last time he came to visit. Great, simple dinner, bursting with flavor and texture 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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Preparation :
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simmer pork shank's in stock seasoned with star anis, cinnamon, garlic paste, black pepper, salt and grated ginger until tender but NOT falling apart

simmer pork shank’s in stock seasoned with star anis, cinnamon, garlic paste, black pepper, salt and grated ginger until tender but NOT falling apart

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meanwhile, blanch green beans and cook lai fen pasta (rice flour bucatini)

meanwhile, blanch green beans and cook lai fen pasta (rice flour bucatini)

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add beans to soup

add beans to soup

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add diced peppers, onions and lap cheong (chinese sausage), check/adjust seasoning

add diced peppers, onions and lap cheong (chinese sausage), simmer two more minutes, check/adjust seasoning

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add lai fen to serving bowl

add lai fen to serving bowl

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to serve, top noodles  with meat, vegetables and broth, sprinkle with chopped cilantro

to serve, top noodles with meat, vegetables and broth, sprinkle with chopped cilantro

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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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