osso buco

Bulalo (Kansi) Beef Marrow Bone Soup

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Beef Marrow Bone

Beef Marrow Bone

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The  first time I had the pleasure to eat this soup I fell in love with it. It was at “Pistang Filipino”, an open air arts and craft center in Manila. (Little did I know then (1974), that a few years later I would be living next door for nearly five years). However, during my first visit, a couple of friends and I went there to have a proper, traditional “Pinoy” dinner. It turned out to be one of the best meals in my entire life. Pancit sotanghon and pancit bihon, huge grilled prawns for $1 a piece, kare kare, adobo, lechon, sisig, sinigang, bulalo and a whole lot of other wonderful dishes, all spread out on a huge buffet. There were woven bamboo plates with palm leaves to put your food on and coconut shell spoons for the soups. Most of the food was eaten using one’s fingers as utensils. Lined up along one wall were water containers with spouts to facilitate hand washing before and after the meal. The food and entertainment (tinikling , traditional Philippine folk dancing) was superb and to this day I remember almost every minute of that evening. Years later when I lived next door, I went there once or twice a month, mainly for the bulalo . However, I quickly became less enthusiastic about the tinikling. While beautiful to watch, its accompanying music, which was always played at maximum levels, kept me awake many a night until the wee hours 😦
Such is my love for bulalo that until this day I prepare it at least once a month. I mostly use thick sliced shank (osso buco), but when available, I buy a whole leg bone and have the butcher cut it into 4 pieces, 2 of which I use at once and 2 which I freeze for the next going of bulalo or any other beef soup.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here to watch a video of  Tinikling
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Bulalo

Bulalo

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Bulalo

Bulalo

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Bulalo

Bulalo

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Bulalo

Bulalo

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic/Ginger Broth

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Usually  we use this cut of the animal to make Osso Buco (originally done with veal shanks), but I love me a hearty soup more than anything else, so I decided to prepare this dish with some pork shanks my friend Curtis dropped off last time he came to visit. Great, simple dinner, bursting with flavor and texture 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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Preparation :
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simmer pork shank's in stock seasoned with star anis, cinnamon, garlic paste, black pepper, salt and grated ginger until tender but NOT falling apart

simmer pork shank’s in stock seasoned with star anis, cinnamon, garlic paste, black pepper, salt and grated ginger until tender but NOT falling apart

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meanwhile, blanch green beans and cook lai fen pasta (rice flour bucatini)

meanwhile, blanch green beans and cook lai fen pasta (rice flour bucatini)

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add beans to soup

add beans to soup

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add diced peppers, onions and lap cheong (chinese sausage), check/adjust seasoning

add diced peppers, onions and lap cheong (chinese sausage), simmer two more minutes, check/adjust seasoning

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add lai fen to serving bowl

add lai fen to serving bowl

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to serve, top noodles  with meat, vegetables and broth, sprinkle with chopped cilantro

to serve, top noodles with meat, vegetables and broth, sprinkle with chopped cilantro

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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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Pork Shank's & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

Pork Shank’s & Lai Fen In Garlic Ginger Broth

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” Osso Buco “

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Poor people who go through life saying :  Food?  Yeah , whatever.  😦

Tonight’s dinner , another few ounces sticking to my rib’s.
” Osso Buco ” , this one made with beef shanks instead of veal shanks.

 Bon Appetit ! Life is Good !
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” I read this half- assed article by a very prominent and famous TV chef…”

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Slow Roasted Teriyaki  “ Osso Buco ”

Here is what I cooked for myself (& Bella) after I read this half- assed article by a very prominent and famous TV chef/ judge on iron chef , that you have to braise veal shanks for a long time to make them edible.
What a load of crap, as usual, from one of our “recipe chefs ” on TV, most of which have no clue how to cook or be a “chef” in the real world.
Yes, a good traditionally braised Osso Buco can be a wonderful dish, but you lose most of the beautiful texture of the shank. In southern Germany and Austria we have a dish called   “Gebratene Kalbshaxe”  (usually and ideally spit roast ). Just season with salt and pepper, then SLOWLY !!! roast (whole shank or thickly sliced)  until the connective tissues break down (at least 2.5 hours, often up to 4 hours) and you will have the most succulent, tasty, satisfying dish imaginable. During the last 15 minutes, baste liberally with teriyaki sauce.
Just goes to show that if you know and understand only part of something, to pass that on as the full truth will screw up the knowledge of the person who asked you for advise. Happens all the time with non-experienced so called “Chefs” and “Teachers”,  who get all their knowledge and skills by sitting on a school bench instead of learning and, most important, experiencing, the facts, beauty and excitement of cooking  in the real world, through observing and learning from REAL chefs in a REAL kitchen and soaking  up the knowledge and skills offered to them with the passion of a real chef.


Bon Appetit !    Life is Good !
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