Salads

Herring Salad – (Heringsalat) – (Sillsallad) – (Shuba – Селедка под шубой)

 

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At a time when “Regional” and “Ethnic” cuisine has spread all over the World and most of them have reached the far corners of our Planet, a large part of restaurant-goers consider themselves experts of some, or even many, different ethnic/regional cuisines.
Sadly (naturally), most experiences of these wannabe-experts come from a few visits of neighborhood “ethnic” restaurants and a subscription to the food channel, or, at best, a few encounters of local cuisine one has mustered on a once in a lifetime vacation to an exotic, foreign country.
Therefore, nowadays, when everyone pretends to be “food-hip“, “in” and “worldly“, everybody and Joe want to open a restaurant that serves food from around the World, with the proprietor and workers usually never having encountered a dish that is even close to its supposed origin.
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However, because of this worldwide spreading of cuisines,  most folks have had the pleasure to taste Scandinavian herring salad in one form or another, either in a restaurant or at home, sourced in a small plastic container at the neighborhood supermarket. These come in many different flavors and colors – with fresh dill, fresh chives, potatoes, red beets, cucumbers, pasta, capers, pickles of any type, apples, oranges, eggs, with matjes herring or salt herring, even with added sausage, etc, etc.
Many of them are surprisingly delicious, though, after all, these ingredients are hard to mess up. However, in my humble opinion, of the commercial type herring salads, most have one fundamental fault – they are diced way too small and evenly (which, admittingly, is the proper restaurant-way).
When one forkful contains five or more ingredients of very finely diced ingredients, the mix becomes one coherent mess in your mouth, which I find rather boring. I much rather have the ingredients diced larger, so that with each bite I have two or maybe three different textures and tastes, which results in the pleasure of each bite surprising me with a new combination of yumminess. 🙂
This salad can be served as an appetizer, first course, snack or main course, accompanied by steamed potatoes, sauteed potatoes, rustic bread, or Gouda crackers (as in these pictures).
Pls note that I did not include measurements – let the ratio be guided by your preferences – more or fewer veggies, herring, yogurt, mayo, and so forth – and eliminate any of the ingredients which you don´t like.  🙂
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Herring Salad – (Heringsalat) – (Sillsallad) – (Shuba – Селедка под шубой)

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Herring Salad – (Heringsalat) – (Sillsallad) – (Shuba – Селедка под шубой)

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Herring Salad – (Heringsalat) – (Sillsallad) – (Shuba – Селедка под шубой)

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Herring Salad – (Heringsalat) – (Sillsallad) – (Shuba – Селедка под шубой)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
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Easy Does it # 39 – “Tuna Salad”

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Pls don´t miss the link at the bottom of this page for a truly “different” cooking tutorial ……
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Easy Does it # 39 – “Tuna Salad”

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This salad is probably ? the first “Main Course Salad” that ever hit a restaurant table, way back then.
In the meantime, it has been re-invented/improved a million times, with the ingredients changing from year to year, season to season, cook to cook, household to household, country to country, and restaurant to restaurant.
Probably, the only constant were always salad greens, onions, and tuna, otherwise, the imagination for tuna salad knows no bounds 🙂 Other typical ingredients are (among a million others), anchovies, potatoes, eggs, artichokes, herbs, asparagus, etc, etc.
While I have to admit that my desire to create a “new” version of tuna salad has occasionally got the better of me, my favorite version is still this simple one featured here on this page. 🙂
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Easy Does it # 39 – “Tuna Salad”

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Easy Does it # 39 – “Tuna Salad”

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mix everything with 1/3 cup herb vinaigrette

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check/adjust seasoning

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Preparation :
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And now, one for the road, not to be missed :
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Paris Hilton cooks Lasagna at her own “Cooking Show”
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I am torn between being sad, amused, disgusted and/or outraged about the fact that some folks (many ? !!!) find this to be an actual tutorial to learn cooking.
It is without a doubt a tutorial for various bad traits – but cooking is definitely not one of them 🙂 😦
This episode is one of the worst examples of how bad “cooking shows” have actually become. Most are shameful, ridiculous, bad, stupid and, flat-out, pure garbage.
My only hope is that this particular one is supposed to be satire and not to be taken seriously, but, judging from the ladies behavior and the general state of mind of the kind of people who watch crap like this, chances are that it is meant to be taken seriously:-(
God help us all !
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Salad Of Smoked Beef, Gouda, Egg, Avocado, Cucumber And Tomato In Herb Vinaigrette, Served With Taralli

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Salad Of Smoked Beef, Gouda, Egg, Avocado, Cucumber And Tomato In Herb Vinaigrette, Served With Taralli

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Here we have another “empty out the fridge salad” that could have not been more delicious, pretty and appetizing, even if I tried  🙂
Its been said a million times, yet it still holds the truth :
When you cook, the most important ingredients for a dish are a bit of knowledge and a lot of love, the rest will take care of itself  🙂 
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Salad Of Smoked Beef, Gouda, Egg, Avocado, Cucumber And Tomato In Herb Vinaigrette, Served With Taralli

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Salad Of Smoked Beef, Gouda, Egg, Avocado, Cucumber And Tomato In Herb Vinaigrette, Served With Taralli

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Salad Of Smoked Beef, Gouda, Egg, Avocado, Cucumber And Tomato In Herb Vinaigrette, Served With Taralli

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
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Cheese & Tomato Salad – Heirloom Tomatoes, Gouda, Radish, Onion, Basil And Scallion In Herb Vinaigrette

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Cheese & Tomato Salad – Heirloom Tomatoes, Gouda, Radish, Onion, Basil And Scallion In Herb Vinaigrette

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Originally, I named this salad “Summer Salad” when I prepared it in August. But now, summer has passed around here and we are in deep autumn. Most tree leaves have changed from bright green to a golden brown, and the temperatures at night have dropped to a chilly 5 °C .
However. I just skyped with my friends Carlos and Gladis in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the temperature was a toasty 32 °C, the perfect temperature to enjoy this summer salad on the terrace overlooking the pool and garden. 🙂  To see more about Carlos’ and Gladis’ beautiful place, click here “My Trip To Argentina”
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In the meantime, enjoy this wonderful salad anywhere, anytime, and in any weather 🙂
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Cheese & Tomato Salad – Heirloom Tomatoes, Gouda, Radish, Onion, Basil And Scallion In Herb Vinaigrette

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Cheese & Tomato Salad – Heirloom Tomatoes, Gouda, Radish, Onion, Basil And Scallion In Herb Vinaigrette

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Cheese & Tomato Salad – Heirloom Tomatoes, Gouda, Radish, Onion, Basil And Scallion In Herb Vinaigrette

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Cheese , Scallion, Radish & Onion in Herb Vinaigrette

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Preparation :
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A Rare Occasion – “Entrecôte Saignant, Avec Salade Verte À La Française” (Rare Strip Steak With French Style Green Salad)

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A Rare Occasion – “Entrecôte Saignant, Avec Salade Verte À La Française” (Rare Strip Steak With French Style Green Salad)

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Usually, I don´t fancy my red meat cooked rare. Medium rare is more to my liking.
However, today I woke up with a craving for a rare steak. This craving stayed with me until noon, and when it was time to prepare lunch, I decided to give-in and have a rare steak. To my dismay, there was no steak in the fridge, so I had to walk to my neighborhood butcher to get the fine steak pictured here. Its only a 10 minute walk each way, so normally that´s not a problem, but the longer I had to wait to dig in, the bigger the craving grew 🙂
Since the steak was big enough, I thought the only side I needed was a green salad, so that was it. A few slices of bread below the steak to soak up the juices and there it was – the perfect solution to satisfy my hours-long craving 🙂
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As for the salad – “Salade Verte À La Française” sounds rather fancy, but it is really just a green salad with a dijon/garlic dressing. This is the classic French salad, the one that invariably appeared whenever you wandered into a bistro and ordered une salade. It consists simply of lettuce and dressing – no cucumbers, tomatoes, radishes or other embellishments. It doesn’t need them. For it is perfection in its simplicity – light and packed with flavor. The lettuce most often used in France is what Americans call Boston lettuce, and what the French call simply salade . Another favorite is escarole (Scarole in French). Rarely were other types of lettuce used in the old days, but now one may encounter innovations like feuille de chêne, literally oak-leaf, a variety of lettuce with scalloped leaves. As for the dressing, in previous times salade verte was almost always served with vinaigrette à la moutarde – a vinaigrette of Dijon mustard, red wine vinegar, sunflower or peanut oil, salt, pepper and shallot or garlic. In Paris, at least. In southern France, olive oil was used, sometimes with lemon instead of vinegar. Now there are variations throughout the country, with balsamic vinegar and other upstarts making an occasional appearance.
The tragedy today is that it’s next to impossible to find a classic salade verte in a French bistro, much less anywhere else in the restaurant World. The lettuce may be the same, but bottled dressings have largely replaced the homemade vinaigrettes that gave this salad such distinction. The newfangled sauce is runny, white and – perish the thought – can be sweet.
(Part of this description of french salad is an excerpt from “The Everyday French Chef”)
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A Rare Occasion – “Entrecôte Saignant, Avec Salade Verte À La Française” (Rare Strip Steak With French Style Green Salad)

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A Rare Occasion – “Entrecôte Saignant, Avec Salade Verte À La Française” (Rare Strip Steak With French Style Green Salad)

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A Rare Occasion – “Entrecôte Saignant, Avec Salade Verte À La Française” (Rare Strip Steak With French Style Green Salad)

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Salade verte à la française

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grilled sour dough bread

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Preparation :
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Veggie Salad With Chanterelles & Poached Eggs

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BUT FIRST, THIS :
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One of the reasons I moved from Florida back to Germany (besides the Hurricanes) was the fact that I loathe Floridas heat and humidity ( Lets not even mention the traffic).
On the other hand, here in Germany, while we are at the hight of summer, the average temperature is very agreeable, with only the occasional very hot day, and always very little humidity.
But, nevertheless, Florida, Germany, or wherever – who could say no to this beautiful salad, any time of the year, anywhere, and in any weather ?  🙂
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Veggie Salad With Chanterelles & Poached Eggs

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Veggie Salad With Chanterelles & Poached Eggs

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Veggie Salad With Chanterelles & Poached Eggs

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
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Pickled Tomatoes (トマトの酢漬け )

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Pickled Tomatoes (トマトの酢漬け )

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How can you improve a perfect tomato? By pickling it !
Any salad, sandwich or any other dish that contains tomatoes will get an additional level of debt of flavor and texture, so, in my humble opinion, the extra few minutes of preparation will be well worth the time and effort. The recipe for the pickling liquid on this page is only a guideline, you can experiment with the length of marination, as well as the flavor of the marination, for example, omit the dashi, add garlic, increase or decrease the vinegar and sugar, etc, etc.
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Pickled Tomatoes (トマトの酢漬け )

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Pickled Tomatoes (トマトの酢漬け )

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Pickled Tomatoes (トマトの酢漬け )

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Preparation :
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Click here to connect to WORDSFROMANNELI

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Annelis Boat ( Curtesy of WORDSFROMANNELI )

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Annelis boat ( Curtesy of WORDSFROMANNELI )

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Tostadas With Shrimp, Black Bean Salsa & Avocado

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Tostadas With Shrimp, Black Bean Salsa & Avocado

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Just my kind of “Junk Food”
After all, ready-made tostadas from a pack ??? !!!!  Beans from a can ??? !!!!
How low can I sink…..  ??? !!!!  😦   🙂
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Tostadas With Shrimp, Black Bean Salsa & Avocado

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Tostadas With Shrimp, Black Bean Salsa & Avocado

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Tostadas With Shrimp, Black Bean Salsa & Avocado

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Tostadas With Shrimp, Black Bean Salsa & Avocado

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Preparation :
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To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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Steak Salad # 2153

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Steak Salad # 2153

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While I crave for steak at least once or twice a week, I can´t say the same for salad, although I absolutely love a good salad. However, STEAK SALAD (or SEAFOOD SALAD)  I can happily eat daily.
Of course, the meat/seafood must be combined intelligently with ingredients which enhance the dish, not just be a cheap filler. In the average restaurant these days, too many times the combinations appearing in front of you are less than fortunate, and the concoction of a tiny bit of inferior meat/seafood and a bunch of “rabbit food”  ( mostly the outer leaves of greens) and some crappy bottled “dressing” does nothing to justify the (usually) premium price of most restaurants steak/seafood salad.
So, as usual, if I want the good stuff, I pretty much have to prep it at home.  🙂
Yes I know, there ARE great restaurants out there, but unfortunately, they are harder to find by the day.  😦
The overwhelming reasons are not only the lack of education, talent, pride and practice by the cooks and “chefs”, but the lack of food education and common food-sense by the customers, which makes education, talent, pride and practice to produce decent food for an acceptable price mostly obsolete.  😦
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Click here for some great and some not so great Steak Salads on the Net
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Click here for some great and some not so great Seafood Salads on the Net
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P.S.
Obviously, the quantities for this dish are clearly visible in the pics. This amount makes one generous main course or four appetizers/snacks. However, if you have a beloved dog, you might want to double the amount of meat.  🙂
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Steak Salad # 2153

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Steak Salad # 2153

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Steak Salad # 2153

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Steak Salad # 2153

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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