rice cakes

Japanese Pork, Korean Rice Cakes And French Beans (Teriyaki Feast)

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While  the ingredients for this dish (and the cooking methods) are not exactly a traditional combination, for my personal palette they compliment each other perfectly. They are typical for the dishes I prepare for myself at home. On the other hand, would I still cater to guests at a restaurant or at home, I would not hesitate to serve this kind of food as a course in a multi-course menu. (As I have done many times).
Having been trained in and practiced for most of my career classic French cuisine, as well as garnering experience in local cuisines around the globe, this type of “fusion cuisine” has become  my personal cooking style. Nowadays, cooking mostly for myself, a few close friends and the occasional high-end private gig, I don’t have to confirm to traditional cuisines anymore; – my food has become truly a fusion of dishes, methods and ingredients from around the world. Mind you, I don’t try to make my food appear haphazardly strange or exotic on purpose, but sometimes that’s the result when mixing without restraint 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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P.S.
“Teriyaki” in this dish refers to the teriyaki sauce as part of the dish, not the traditional cooking method.     Click for  Teriyaki
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Japanese Pork, Korean Rice Cakes And French Beans

Japanese Pork, Korean Rice Cakes And French Beans

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Japanese Pork, Korean Rice Cakes And French Beans

Japanese Pork, Korean Rice Cakes And French Beans

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Standard cup board items in my kitchen:
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Dwaeji Bulgogi & Tteokbokki (Korean Spicy Marinated Pork & Spicy Korean Rice Cake Stew)

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I often  wonder why there are not more Korean restaurants around here, given the wide variety of Korean foods which should appeal to most westerners, especially the grilled dishes such as Galbi, Bulgogi and Dak Galbi. Also much liked by me are a number of pasta dishes, most of all Chap Chae, Bibim-naengmyeon and of course Tteokbokki, which appears below. A tougher sale for the uninitiated diner might be the omnipresent Kimchi, which is no doubt an acquired taste (but then, once acquired……. 🙂
So , as is so often the case when a craving for special food comes knocking, I had to start my own fires to cook the food I was longing for 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Dwaeji Bulgogi

Dwaeji Bulgogi

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Tteokbokki

Tteokbokki

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Dwaeji Bulgogi, Tteokbokki And Kimchi

Dwaeji Bulgogi, Tteokbokki And Kimchi

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Pied De Cochon

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ANYTHING  sounds better in french ?! 🙂
I used to call my wife “Mon Petit Chou”, which sounds perfectly sweet and romantic in french. Translated, it’s “My Little Cabbage” :-(. Not as sweet and romantic, no doubt.
Same with my dinner today : “Pied De Cochon – which translates into “Pig’s Trotters”, one of my all time favorite second cuts.
Pigs trotters are very versatile, they are great fried, steamed, braised, and pickled.
The following dish was created today in my kitchen and, I must say, it was absolutely delicious (and pretty to look at, to boost).
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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More “Pig’s Goodies” on ChefsOpinion
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Wiki on Pigs Trotters
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More about Pigs Trotters
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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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 Pied De Cochon

Pied De Cochon

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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