radish

Old Fashioned Hoisin Glazed Grilled Tuna Steak

Old Fashioned Hoisin Glazed Grilled Tuna Steak

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If  you wonder why I call this dish “old fashioned”, the answer is simple: “It is fully cooked but still juicy”, which is undoubtedly one of the most difficult things to master in good cooking and unfortunately a part of our craft lost to the majority of today’s cooks/ chefs.
In order to cook any food item, especially seafood and poultry, the cook/chef has to take into consideration the carry-over heat of the food item, which will depend on the thickness, cooking temperature, texture, and the time it takes the food from the time it is removed from cooking equipment in the kitchen to being served on a plate and starting to be eaten by the customer. Get this wrong and your dish is ruined! 😦
Old fashioned, because once this was an absolute necessity for any cook to master in order to be rightfully employed in a professional kitchen, while nowadays, sadly, cooks who perfectly have mastered this most important skill are the exception. (Hence, all the undercooked or overcooked meat, seafood, and even vegetables). It is so much easier to rather just “pan sear” a piece of fish than to perfectly cook it. While there certainly is a place and time for sashimi, and one has to admire the chefs who serve it perfectly, the majority of the fish quality served in most restaurants, homes, supermarkets, etc, make this way of serving fish a ridiculous way of trying to cover-up the cooks/chefs inability to cook the fish and other food perfectly.
NO raw fish has the beautiful texture and is as juicy as a perfectly cooked fish! NONE !
And don’t even get me going on half cooked pork or chicken breast 😦
But enough of this, let’s get back to the dish at hand. Instead of the more common teriyaki glaze, I glazed the tuna with hoisin sauce, which was even better, at least for my personal taste.
If you look at the pictures, you will notice that I have not removed the “blood line” from the fillet. When preparing tuna for myself, I always cook the filet with this dark flesh attached. When I was still preparing food in restaurants, I removed this part because the flavor is very strong and some folks don’t like it. (Bella does, so no questions asked at our house 🙂  (Also see note below)
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for  Steamed Rice Recipe (Fan)  on  ChefsOpinion
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P.S.
“That dark, nearly black area on the side of your tuna or swordfish steak is nothing bad or unhealthy, although you may not like it’s strong flavor. It is a muscle that is rich in myoglobin, a blood pigment. But lest that sound creepy to you, bear in mind that myoglobin is the same iron-containing pigment that makes red meat red.You can leave it in when you cook the fish: the stronger flavor of that small area will not affect the taste of the rest of the fish.”
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Old Fashioned Hoisin Glazed Grilled Tuna Steak

Old Fashioned Hoisin Glazed Grilled Tuna Steak

Old Fashioned Hoisin Glazed Grilled Tuna Steak

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Preparation :
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Pozole

Pozole

Pozole

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Partial  excerpts from Wikipedia:
“Pozole. Variants: pozolé, pozolli, pasole), which means “hominy”, is a traditional soup or stew from Mexico, which once had ritual significance. It is made from hominy, with meat (typically pork), and can be seasoned and garnished with shredded cabbage, chile peppers, onion, garlic, radishes, avocado, salsa and/or limes.
It is a typical dish in various states such as Sinaloa, Michoacán, Guerrero, Zacatecas, Jalisco, Morelos, State of Mexico and Distrito Federal. Pozole is served in Mexican restaurants worldwide.
Pozole is frequently served as a celebratory dish throughout Mexico and by Mexican communities outside Mexico. Common occasions include Mexico Independence Day, quince años, weddings, birthdays, baptisms, and New Year’s Day.
Pozole can be prepared in many ways. All variations include a base of cooked hominy in broth. Typically pork, or sometimes chicken, is included in the base. Vegetarian recipes substitute beans for the meat.
Dried hominy can be used for pozole, but it must be soaked and cooked
The three main types of pozole are blanco/white, verde/green and rojo/red.
White Pozole is the preparation without any additional green or red sauce. Green Pozole adds a rich sauce based on green ingredients, possibly including tomatillos, epazote, cilantro, jalapeños, and/or pepitas. Red Pozole is made without the green sauce, instead adding a red sauce made from one or more chiles, such as guajillo, piquin, or ancho.
When pozole is served, it is accompanied by a wide variety of condiments, potentially including chopped onion, shredded lettuce, sliced radish, cabbage, avocado, limes, oregano, tostadas, chicharrónes, and/or chiles.
Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún‘s General History of the Things of New Spain (c. 1500). Since maize was a sacred plant for the Aztecs and other inhabitants of Mesoamerica, pozole was made to be consumed on special occasions. The conjunction of maize (usually whole hominy kernels) and meat in a single dish is of particular interest to scholars, because the ancient Americans(which?) believed the gods made humans out of masa (cornmeal dough).”
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According to research by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (National Institute of Anthropology and History) and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, on these special occasions, the meat used in the pozole was human. After the prisoners were killed by having their hearts torn out in a ritual sacrifice, the rest of the body was chopped and cooked with maize, and the resulting meal was shared among the whole community as an act of religious communion. After the Conquest, when cannibalism was banned, pork became the staple meat as it “tasted very similar” [to human flesh], according to a Spanish priest.

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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Pozole

Pozole

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Pozole

Pozole

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Preparation :
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BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS # 58 – Shrimp Croissant And Fresh Fruits With Kefir And Honey

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What a wonderful way to start the day early today – a walk in the park with Bella, a great breakfast with Bella, then a great movie – “Galaxy Quest” (Bella not interested), all followed by a long nap ! (Bella enthusiastically interested again) 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Breakfast of Champions  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for more Tonkatsu  and  Donkatsu  on  ChefsOpinion
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Tonkatsu sauce  (my way) :

Mix 1/2 cup ketchup, 2 tblsp soy sauce, 1 tsp garlic paste, 1 tsp mustard, 1 tblsp white wine (or sherry), 1 tsp sriracha and a few drops of maggi seasoning.

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BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS # 58 - Shrimp Croissant And Fresh Fruits With Kefir And Honey

BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS # 58 – Shrimp Croissant And Fresh Fruits With Kefir And Honey

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BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS # 58 - Shrimp Croissant And Fresh Fruits With Kefir And Honey

BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS # 58 – Shrimp Croissant And Fresh Fruits With Kefir And Honey

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Fresh Fruit With Kefir And Honey

Fresh Fruit With Kefir And Honey

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Preparation :
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Pork And Noodles In Two Parts – “Part One”


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Usually , I prepare one dish with enough ingredients  to last me for two meals, then just re-heat the left-overs for the next meal, which I intended to do this time as well.
I made a large pot of soup for lunch, enjoyed two bowls of it and then proceeded to put the left-overs in separate containers and into the fridge to be re-heated for dinner.
One container for the pork, one for the noodles, then strain the vegetables and store the veggies and the broth in another two containers , put it all in the fridge, washed the dishes and sat down to watch a movie.
Halfway through the movie, it occured to me that I had only put THREE containers into the fridge, when there should have been FOUR! Low and behold, when I checked, there were only three containers in the fridge – and a sparkly-clean one in the dish rack.
Quel Gâchis !….. I had strained the delicious broth into the sink instead of into the container 😦
So later when dinnertime came around, I had to start improvising for a new dish with the left-overs which were still available.
First, I put the veggies to the side to be  Eugene’s  meal the next day.
This left me with just noodles and pork, from which I prepared “Crisp Yi Mein Noodle Pillow With Fiery Chile Pork”.
And wow,  what a glorious dish this was !!! I could not have planned it better if I wanted to…….(Well, maybe) 🙂
More of “Crisp Yi Mein Noodle Pillow With Fiery Chile Pork” in my next post :  Pork And Noodles In Two Parts – “Part Two”
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Noodles  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for more  Soup  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for more  Pork  on  ChefsOpinion
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Ginger/Garlic Pork Soup With Vegetables And Yi Mein Noodles

Ginger/Garlic Pork Soup With Vegetables And Yi Mein Noodles

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Ginger/Garlic Pork Soup With Vegetables And Yi Mein Noodles

Ginger/Garlic Pork Soup With Vegetables And Yi Mein Noodles

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Ginger/Garlic Pork Soup With Vegetables And Yi Mein Noodles

Ginger/Garlic Pork Soup With Vegetables And Yi Mein Noodles

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Preparation :
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Pulled Pork “Havana Loco”

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havana
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For  most of my life I detested the very idea of pulled pork. My professional training as a cook had taught me that if something falls apart, it is overcooked and therefore non grata. In addition, the pulled pork I was introduced to during my early years in the USA was almost always smoked for many hours, then completely inundated in (most of the time crappy) “bbq sauce”.
The whole thing seemed to me to have the texture and taste of some lousy half-smoked cigars mashed-up and mixed with ketchup and vinegar, more often than not served on a limp, tasteless burger bun. As a result, for many years I stayed away from pulled pork.
This changed when I got to travel in Latin America and in Latin American-circles, where pulled pork took on a very different dimension, one which I was finally able to wholeheartedly embrace. Usually braised in the oven for hours, with lots of cilantro, lime, garlic, various citrus juices and sometimes the addition of onions and/or chilies, the pork tastes lively and fresh, not at all heavy or greasy or overly sweet. Usually, it is served with white rice and yucca or a simple salad and most of the time with some kind of spicy, vinegar based condiment.
Below find my own take on pulled pork, as I imagine I would serve it at my imaginary, popular nightspot in a Havana of long-gone times, with hot girls dancing to the Rumba, Mojitos flowing freely and eating, drinking, dancing, making love and enjoying life being the only thing on everybody’s mind……………..
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Bon Appetit ! Life is Good !
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Pulled Pork

Pulled Pork “Havana Loco”

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Pulled Pork

Pulled Pork “Havana Loco”

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Pulled Pork

Pulled Pork “Havana Loco”

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Preparation :
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Obatzda (Bavarian Cheese Sandwich – Boss Level)

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Sadly,  most of us will not be able to attend the real  Oktoberfest  in  Munich  this month 😦
So, to help you dream about actually being there in person, here is one of the quintessential dishes one might consume together with a  Maß Bier  (or  even a few Maß )  at the Oktoberfest  or any other beer-garden, or, as I did today, in my chair in front of the TV, watching the Oktoberfest on Deutsche Welle TV and having a Maß  of iced tea 🙂
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Guten Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Obatzda (Cheese Sandwich - Boss Level)

Obatzda (Bavarian Cheese Sandwich – Boss Level)

Obatzda (Bavarian Cheese Sandwich – Boss Level)

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Obatzda (Cheese Sandwich - Boss Level)

Obatzda (Bavarian Cheese Sandwich – Boss Level)

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Preparation :
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Salade De Pâtes

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A simple  pasta salad will, more often then not, hit the spot for a simple yet satisfying meal.
And if you add some fruits to it, culinary bliss will be achieved with a minimum of fuss and expense 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is good !
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P.S.
Use any protein or vegetable to replace the bologna and Swiss cheese, such as shrimp, crab meat, chicken, roast beef and/or any vegetable and cheese at hand.
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More Pasta Salad
Even more Pasta Salad
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Pasta Salad. Salade De  Pâtes

Pasta Salad. Salade De Pâtes

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Pasta Salad. Salade De  Pâtes

Pasta Salad. Salade De Pâtes

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Preparation :
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The Italianator

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Sometimes,  a simple sandwich can satisfy all my culinary needs, as long as it is interesting, tasty and – yes – as long as it looks great and appetizing!
When a slice of dry turkey and sandwich spread between two slices of wonder bread won’t do, (which, for me, is NEVER!),  a sexy beauty like “The Italianator”  will surely ring the bells of culinary bliss and lets me forget steaks and lobsters, at least for the moment.
– And on top of it, getting to name these creations is much fun in itself. 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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The Italianator

The Italianator

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The Italianator

The Italianator

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Preparation :
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Week One – Tuesday Dinner

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Today’s post on “Hans’ Lighter, Healthier Comfort Food” 

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Week One – Tuesday Dinner
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Chicken Noodle Soup
(Cornish Hen, Whole Grain Pasta, Broccoli)

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Bon Appetit ! Enjoy a Healthy, Happy Life !
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Salad Tessinoise

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Salad Tessinoise

Salad Tessinoise

 

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Preparation : 
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The Slammer

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It  is great to have the liberty to name the dishes one creates, even using somewhat goofy but fitting names, such as “The Slammer” 🙂
This is one of the dishes which owe their creation to the fact that sometimes I think I have nothing in the fridge to prep a great meal and going to the shop is not an option. Out of this familiar dilemma, sometimes a wonderful dish finds the light of day, as happened with this mouthwatering, sexy sandwich.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Link to Hans’ Homemade Buffalo Sauce
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The Slammer

The Slammer

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The Slammer

The Slammer

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Preparation :
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