udon noodles

Chicken And Udon In Coconut/Chili Soup

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Chicken And Udon In Coconut/Chili Soup

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While this soup might seem a bit in the style of Thai food, it actually isn´t, but rather, it is a combination of things I love to be in my food – juicy simmered or roasted chicken, coconut/chicken broth, ginger, garlic, Ichimi togarashi, furikake, cilantro, Thai sweet chili sauce, and udon noodles, items you can usually find at all times in my fridge and in my cup board.
Not Thai at all, but rather a fusion of food/ingredients from different countries/cultures, combined to form their own, delicious bond, without being too complicated to prepare with ease in a short time, or being too heavy on the wallet. 🙂
In fact, if you already have leftover cooked (or roasted) chicken in your fridge, the whole process of assembling and finishing this dish will not take more than a few minutes 🙂
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Pls note :
Adjust the quantities and use of all the ingredients according to your own moods, taste buds and their availability.  🙂

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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Chicken And Udon In Coconut/Chili Soup

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Chicken And Udon In Coconut/Chili Soup

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Chicken And Udon In Coconut/Chili Soup

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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The food at our house is usually flavorful and piquant, but not “fiery hot”.
However, once in a while, I crave Szechuan food. Not the watered down version you get in Western influenced restaurants, but the real, Szechuan deal. ( When you look at the pictures of the noodles with sauce below, that bright red comes from the Szechuan chili oil and Szechuan chili paste) If you prepare this recipe, you might want to add the chili oil and chili paste at the end (STEP 2),  in VERY small increments, until you reach a level of hotness that almost hurts. The beauty of Szechuan peppers is the fact that after a few seconds of eating them, your mouth becomes almost numb, to the point where you can tolerate spice to a level you did not previously imagine you could.
This might sounds a bit like a bit of senseless torture (to the novice to Szechuan cuisine it certainly is), but it will also provide you with an extreme satisfaction of your taste buds 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Szechuan Beef Noodles

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Preparation :
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To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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Lazy Udon

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Throughout all the years I have spent in the food-industry, I came across many folks who proclaimed their jealousy about the fact that I, as a chef, eat better than anybody else they know.
Reading private food blogs, one would assume that this might be the case not only for chefs, but also for food bloggers, since most of the food published at least looks better than what shows up daily on the average household’s table.
While some bloggers are fortunate enough to eat the high level food they publicize on their sites at all times, most of us less fortunate bloggers neither have the time,the money nor the desire to eat gourmet meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner. In my own case, I usually prepare food that is (in my opinion) fit to publish about every other or every third day,  including down to earth comfort food. The rest of the time, I eat the same simple food as most other folks do, although probably prepared with a bit more love and interest in the end result as most home cooks (or chefs at home) will muster day-in and day-out. This however does not mean that the food I don’t publish is poor or crappy.
The meal I had for lunch today is just such an example. I prepare similar noodles quite often, using slightly different ingredients such as different pasta, different veggies and different seasonings (although the seasoning used here is pretty standard for my “Lazy Noodles” dishes). 
At once extremely simple, easy to prepare and cheap, it is at the same time pretty to look at and super yummy. If prepared with love and attention to detail, food like this does not have to hide itself behind any “gourmet” food 🙂
Not that I want to eat like this all the time, but in reality, food like this makes perfect sense as alternative to the high-end stuff.
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Lazy Udon

Lazy Udon

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Lazy Udon

Lazy Udon

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
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Stir Fried Squid, Udon Noodles And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce ( Yakiudon)

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There are few dishes more comforting and satisfying than a bowl of noodles with a rich sauce or in a tasty soup – either by itself or with other “stuff” thrown in, such as any kind of vegetables, mushrooms, eggs and any protein such as pork, chicken, duck or seafood. While for me, any noodle is a good noodle, udon noodles rank on top of my favorite list – the plumper the better.
Lately, I’ve been buying the vacuum packaged “fresh” udon noodles from my neighborhood Asian market, but I also have had good experiences with the frozen type more readily available around here. As for the sauce, I like to prep it as simple as possible – soy sauce, oyster sauce or hoi sin sauce, chili paste, honey or sugar, ginger and garlic, sesame oil, chicken-, vegetable- or pork-stock. For a bit of variation in the sauce, I sometimes add a bit of peanut butter or fermented bean sauce, but that’s it – simple comfort food quickly and easily prepared and always just hitting the right spot 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Udon  on  ChefsOpinion
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Stir Fried Squid, Udon And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce  (Yaki Udon)

Stir Fried Squid, Udon And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce (Yaki Udon)


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Stir Fried Squid, Udon And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce (Yaki Udon)

Stir Fried Squid, Udon And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce (Yaki Udon)

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Stir Fried Squid, Udon And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce  (Yaki Udon)

Stir Fried Squid, Udon And Bok Choy In Oyster Sauce (Yaki Udon)

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
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Mushrooms And Udon Noodles In Oyster Sauce

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It seems  to me that the biggest return (culinary bliss and satisfaction) for the smallest investment (time, money and work) was, is and always will be, the preparation of food.
While there are of course very expensive, time-consuming, complicated and labor intensive dishes to be had, the majority of great food can be prepared in a snap. The following is just one of these dishes. All ingredients can be had for a few bucks and the actual prep and cooking time is only about 15 minutes.
So folks, please don’t say you don’t have time to cook. Just face your demon’s and admit that you don’t like to cook 🙂 😦 .
On the other hand, if you don’t know how to cook, that’s a whole different story. For you I have a simple solution to that malady : Follow my blog and get inspiration for simple dishes and instructions how to prepare them- this will be the first step to help you overcome the biggest hurdle, because most of the instructions on  ChefsOpinion  are dead-simple and require only the most basic culinary knowledge to produce great results.
First step – start trying………. 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   You Can Do It !!!
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More Udon dishes on ChefsOpinion
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Mushrooms And Udon Noodles In Oyster Sauce

Mushrooms And Udon Noodles In Oyster Sauce

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Mushrooms And Udon Noodles In Oyster Sauce
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Mushrooms And Udon Noodles In Oyster Sauce

Mushrooms And Udon Noodles In Oyster Sauce

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Asian Inspired Duck & Udon Soup

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This  soup is my  “to go to”  soup when I have leftover duck or goose (yesterdays roast duck) . It is quick and easy and oh so delicious. The vegetables and noodles are interchangeable with any vegetables and pasta you might have at hand, such as cabbage, bok choy, shiitake or spinach, or egg noodles, rice noodles, mung bean noodles. Use whatever is at hand and tickles your fancy 🙂
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Chop up the carcasse and other leftover bones and bits of meat and simmer with garlic, ginger, salt, lime slices, a bit of sugar and sriracha sauce for 45 minutes. Skim of all foam which rises during this time. Strain stock and discard solids. Adjust seasoning to your liking. Place hot udon noodles and blanched vegetables in a serving bowl, top with sliced duck pieces and cover with broth. Drizzle with some hot chili oil. Serve with a side dish of hoi sin sauce and sriracha sauce to dip the duck.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Asian Inspired Duck & Udon Soup

Asian Inspired Duck & Udon Soup

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Udon, Seafood & Bok Choy

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As far as I am concerned, all noodles could be udon noodles.
I just love them in any prep variation, be it with seafood, beef,
mushrooms, in a soup, sautéed, stir fried, any which way will do it for me 🙂
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Click here to read all about UDON
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Ingredient’s :

Udon noodles,   fresh, from your Asian market
Mixed seafood,  any type you prefer
Baby bok choy,
Onion,   sliced
Cilantro,   coarsely chopped
Garlic,   paste
Ginger,   grated
Soy sauce,
Sherry,
Sriracha,
Oyster sauce,
Sesame oil,
Chili oil,
Lime juice,
Peanut oil, to saute

Method :

Saute seafood in very hot peanut oil, remove onto absorbent paper. Add onion, garlic and ginger and saute until translucent and fragrant. Add noodles, bok choy, soy sauce, oyster sayce, sriracha and a bit of sherry wine and saute until noodles are heated trough. Remove from heat, add seafood and sesame oil, mix well. To serve, drizzle with lime juice and chili oil, sprinkle with cilantro.

Note:
As you can see from the mis en place picture, I used inexpensive  (but nevertheless good) mixed seafood since this was only a go-between snack. For a more elegant and important meal, use large prawns, scallops, lobster, mussels, etc. However, the taste of the dish and the texture of the noodles should be satisfying either way.

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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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