Hans Susser

Hallelujah !!!!!!!!

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Cheers !  Happy Retirement . May 2015

Cheers ! Happy Retirement . May 2015

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Hallelujah !!!!!!!!
I am officially retired 🙂
Received my first SS check today.
After 48 years as a professional cook, it was about time !
Cheers !!! 🙂
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Matzoball & Corned Beef Soup

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Today’s  lunch pay’s homage to the fact that tomorrow is St Paddy’s day and to the fact that corned beef is not really Irish in origin but has its roots in the Jewish community 🙂
(Before you scream at me, you might want to read the article below)

Is Corned Beef Really Irish?
The rise and fall and rise of the traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal
By Shaylyn Esposito, smithsonian.com , March 15, 2013

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Besides that, look at the pictures of this culinary knockout! If you are a soup lover, you won’t be able to resist this sexy, curvy beauty 🙂
I prepare this dish and many variations of it many times during the year, although usually I use regular beef, chicken or vegetable broth.
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Bon Appetit !   B’taya Von !   Gow dty vee dty fondagh !   Go raibh an bia blasta !
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Click Here For  Corned Beef  &  Corned Beef Soup  Recipes
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Click Here for  Matzo Ball  Recipe
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Click Here For More  St Paddy’s Day  Recipes
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Matzoball  & Corned Beef Soup

Matzoball & Corned Beef Soup

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Matzoball  & Corned Beef Soup

Matzoball & Corned Beef Soup

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Downloadable Monthly Desktop Calendar, March 2015, US Edition and International Edition

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Downloadable Monthly Calendar, US Edition and International Edition
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To display the calendar on your computer screen :

> download the calendar of your choice to your desktop,
> right-click on the image,
> choose the option that says, “Set as Desktop Background”, (exact wording will depend on the browser you use).

If the image does not fit your desktop background neatly, you may have to go to your preference panel :

Control Panel
> Display
> Desktop) and choose “Fit to screen” as the display mode of your background image. (Mac users will have to use different commands to the same effect).

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March   2015 :

Seafood Salad
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March 2015, US Edition:
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March 2015 Calendar US
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March 2015, International Edition:
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March 2015 Calendar Intern.
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Seafood Salad

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This  afternoon I went to my fishmonger with the intention to get a fresh trout or a small snapper for a light dinner of fish and salad. What I came away with instead were the following:
Caviar, snow crab legs, king crab legs, clams, mussels, shrimp and crayfish. A short trip to the grocer for some endive, iceberg, grissini and a lemon, then five minutes of preparation and BINGO ! – best meal of the month 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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P.S.
I got a bit carried away with the amount of pictures here, but this stuff is just too sexy and beautiful not to show off and drool over 🙂
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P.P.S.
If you wonder why there is no “fru fru” on this dish – I believe these beauties need no embellishment other than them self.
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Seafood Salad - lettuce in lime vinaigrette, endive in lime vinaigrette, grissini, lemon, caviar on sour dough bread, mussels, clams, shrimp. king crab, snow crab, crayfish, scallops

Seafood Salad – lettuce in lime vinaigrette, endive in lime vinaigrette, grissini, lemon, caviar on sour dough bread, mussels, clams, shrimp. king crab, snow crab, crayfish, scallops

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Seafood Salad - lettuce in lime vinaigrette, endive in lime vinaigrette, grissini, lemon, caviar on sour dough bread, mussels, clams, shrimp. king crab, snow crab, crayfish, scallops

Seafood Salad – lettuce in lime vinaigrette, endive in lime vinaigrette, grissini, lemon, caviar on sour dough bread, mussels, clams, shrimp. king crab, snow crab, crayfish, scallops

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Seafood Salad - lettuce in lime vinaigrette, endive in lime vinaigrette, grissini, lemon, caviar on sour dough bread, mussels, clams, shrimp. king crab, snow crab, crayfish, scallops

Seafood Salad – lettuce in lime vinaigrette, endive in lime vinaigrette, grissini, lemon, caviar on sour dough bread, mussels, clams, shrimp. king crab, snow crab, crayfish, scallops

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Gekochtes Rindfleish In Meerettich Sauce – Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

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One  of the reasons I miss Europe so much is the fact that dishes like this are practically impossible to find on a restaurant menu here (or in any home, for that matter). Simple, delicious, real food one can eat with gusto. Mind you, I would not want this every day, but once in a while…….
So, as usual, if you want the best, you might as well learn to prepare it yourself 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Gekochtes Rindfleish In Meerettich Sauce -  Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

Gekochtes Rindfleish In Meerettich Sauce – Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

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Gekochtes Rindfleish In Meerettich Sauce -  Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

Gekochtes Rindfleish In Meerettich Sauce – Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

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Preparation :
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beef chuck roast or other braising cut root vegetables, water, bring to a simmer, cook until meat is tender, remove meat, set meat aside

beef chuck roast (or other braising cut), root vegetables, water, small amount of salt, bring to a simmer, cook until meat is tender, remove meat, set aside

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strain stock through a fine sieve

strain stock through a fine sieve

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skim fat from surface

skim fat from surface

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make a white roux of half butter and half a/p flour, add stock, whisk to avoid lumps, simmer for 15 minutes, strain through a fine mesh strainer

make a white roux of half butter and half a/p flour, add stock, whisk to avoid lumps, simmer for 15 minutes, strain through a fine mesh strainer

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add heavy cream, kosher salt and white pepper, check / adjust seasoning

add heavy cream, kosher salt and white pepper, check / adjust seasoning

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add grated horseradish

add grated horseradish

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start cabbage by sauteing   onions in garlic oil

start cabbage by sauteing onions in garlic oil

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add diced cabbage

add diced cabbage

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add red and green peppers. kosher salt, cayenne pepper, maggi seasoning, saute until cabbage softens a bit, check / adjust seasoning

add red and green peppers. kosher salt, cayenne pepper, maggi seasoning, saute until cabbage softens a bit, check / adjust seasoning

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saute small blanched potatoes in garlic oil until golden, season with kosher salt and cayenne pepper

saute small blanched potatoes in garlic oil until golden, season with kosher salt and cayenne pepper

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slice beef , arrange on serving platter

slice beef , arrange on serving dish

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nape with horseradish sauce

nape with horseradish sauce

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serve with sauteed cabbage and potatoes

serve with sauteed cabbage and potatoes

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Gekochtes Rindfleish In Meerettich Sauce -  Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

Gekochtes Rindfleisch In Meerettich Sauce – Boiled Chuck Roast In Horseradish Sauce

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New Look Of ChefsOpinion

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hans-susser1

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Dear Friend’s

Please let me know if you prefer the new, streamlined and brighter look of ChefsOpinion or the look of the  previous version 🙂

Thank you.
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Chickenbreast & Zitoni Tagliati In Spicy Red Wine & Mascarpone Cream

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Sitting outside in the fresh air the whole evening and most of the night, having good conversations, listening to good music, drinking good wine and just having a great time for many hours has usually different results. Some folks get tipsy, some get tired, some get overly excited about the topics of the night. However, my friends and I usually can agree to one thing around the time midnight strikes: Time to eat ! And no matter how many times my buddies find their way to the fridge and the bar to get more drinks, somehow they always forget where I keep the raw food and the pots and pans.
So, as usual, friday night we all decided we had to have a substantial midnight snack.
Also, as usual, everybody decided that the only one “qualified and sober enough” to do the job of feeding us all would be me 🙂
Here is the crowd pleaser we wolfed down last night:
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Chickenbreast & Zitoni Tagliati In Spicy Red Wine & Mascarpone Cream

Chickenbreast & Zitoni Tagliati In Spicy Red Wine & Mascarpone Cream

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Ingredients :

Chicken breast,   cut into large “chunks”
Zitoni tagliati,  cooked  al dente, some cooking liquid reserved
Broccoli florettes,   blanched
Onions,   sliced  (lots of them)
Tomatoes,   sliced
Scallions,   finely sliced
Pecorino romano,   finely grated
Mascarpone,
Red wine,   (use the one you are drinking)
Butter,
Kosher salt,
Sriracha,   (lots of it)
Roasted garlic paste,  (lots of it)

Method :

Saute chicken in butter until 160 F, remove , set aside (The carry-over heat and re-heating will take it to a safe 165F). Saute onions and garlic until onions are golden and garlic is fragrant. At this point your butter will have turned into  “buurre noisette”, light brown with a nutty flavor. Add red wine and let reduce by half. Add chicken with its juices, vegetables, pasta and seasoning, saute until heated through. Add mascarpone and pecorino romano. Mix until a creamy sauce develops. If the sauce is too thin, add more cheese, If too thick, add some of the reserved cooking liquid and / or red wine. To serve, sprinkle with more pecorino and the sliced scallions.

Bon Appetit !  Life is Good !

Always value good friends, good conversations, good food,  and good wine 🙂

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From Cook To Chef. A Long, Tough & Very Rewarding Journey

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” Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. “

Dear Friends of ChefsOpinion,

When I started this blog in April of 2012, my circle of readers was very small and consisted mostly of friends and colleagues I knew already from other parts of life.
Now, one year later, the situation has changed tremendously, with daily clicks averaging between 400/500, on someday’s far exceeding the 1000 click mark 🙂
Lot’s of folks stumble across ChefsOpinion by accident and have no idea about my professional background , where and what I’ve been and what the philosophy of  ChefsOpinion is all about .
So, since I had so many inquiries lately about my professional past, I thought I should re-publish the following article of mine which I wrote mainly to address my students at le cordon bleu . It was first published at  ChefCook.us  about three years ago and was re-published here on ChefsOpinion about a year ago. It will give newcomers to ChefsOpinion a bit of information who they are dealing with when they visit my blog and might even enlighten some others about the possibilities and opportunities  which present them self in our line of work.

Should you just start out as a cook and need a bit of encouragement,  I wish you the best of luck!
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From Cook To Chef. A Long, Tough, Rewarding Journey.
An Open Letter To All Young Cooks.

By Chef Hans Susser

So, now that you have established that you want to become a Chef, let’s see how you can get there.
Many established chefs will try to warn you not to join our ranks. This probably comes from chefs who are tired of the position they are in at the moment or who never really made it to the top of our profession or are simply burned out after many years of hard work under less then pretty circumstances.
Keep in mind that for those chefs , in order to get to where they are now, at one point they had to be as enthusiastic, positive and full of dreams as you are at this moment.
The first question that pops up is usually: ” Should I go to culinary school?”
Until a few years ago I would have told everybody that this is a waste of time and money. Unfortunately these day’s, without a piece of paper which proves that you attended school for a certain amount of time, your life/professional expertise is useless in this country and many others. These day’s it is nearly impossible to get to a management position without proof of a degree or at least a diploma from a prestigious school, no matter how much actual experience and skills you possess.
On the other hand, one has to realize that to be a very good cook will only be the minimum requirement once you reach the Executive Chefs position. You must also be very knowledgeable in human resource matters, food cost, labor cost, design, union rules, cleaning, public relations and a myriad of other such things. Most places will hire you to fix those things, not to teach them to you. There is a reason the other chef is not there anymore. A wealth of knowledge and skills, patience and diplomacy is expected from you when you walk in the door. Most of this you cannot learn in a school. It will take years off acquired skills and knowledge to become the Chef that you aspire to be. So here it is : You first need to get your papers (diploma) THEN  (maybe) you will be given the chance to actually learn, experience and practice what you already are “licensed” to do. “Catch 22″,  really.
Don’t be discouraged if things seem to go slow and tedious at the beginning. Think of your culinary career as a kind of snowball:
Lay a small snowball (your Career) on a snowy hill and see what happens: Nothing! But push, push, push and it starts to slowly roll down the hill and after a short time it will start to gain momentum all by itself and off it goes to become a giant snowball ( your Career).

Here now, in a few words, is how the snowball of my career rolled for me:

I started as an apprentice when I was thirteen and a half years old, in a small hotel in the black forest in Germany  (Hotel Wiedenfelsen in Buehlertal). Tough times. Hard work. Long hours, sometimes no day off for many weeks. At that time there were no “shifts”  you were assigned to. It was normal for everybody to work breakfast, lunch and dinner. Eight hour workdays ?! Go work at a bank! During my first year I earned room and board and approximately $20 cash a month. Second year about $60 a month and during the third year probably around $100. From the second year on, an apprentice was expected to run his or her own station. (VERY few girls in the kitchen at that time, 1967). My secret dream at that time was to become a disc jockey as soon as I’d finish my apprenticeship. Thanks God my dad found out and gave me a few fresh ones to set my head straight. The next stations on my journey, as much as I remember now, were as follows:

One winter season as a Commis de Cuisine during winter season in Austria. (Hotel Alpenhof, Jungholz, Tyrol)

One summer season as a Commis de cuisine at the German seaboard. (Hotel See Schloesschen, Timmendorfer Strand).

One summer and winter (1972 summer olympics) as the lone cook with two helpers in a small restaurant and banquet facility in Munich (Gaststaette Zunfthaus).

One year during which I was promoted from Chef Tournant to Executive Chef at a Congress Center in Germany (Congresshalle Boeblingen)  The Chef got sick and I had to take over – there it was, my first big chance.

After that I took a year off to live in Hollywood, California. (A whole different story)
Then, 5 years as a Chef de Partie with Royal Viking Line, traveling around the world. Working hard, partying harder. Making tons of money . Spending tons of money.

After that, back to Germany for some time, working in a five-star restaurant as Chef de Partie (Ratskeller Ludwigsburg) and then going back as Executive Chef to the Congress Center in Boeblingen.

At around 1980 I took a position as Sous Chef at the Manila Midtown Hotel in  Manila, Philippines. I stayed there for a few years and was promoted to my first international position as Executive Chef.

From Manila I moved to Singapore (Excelsior Hotel) and Thailand (VERY extended vacation 🙂  ) and eventually to Miami where I joined Royal Caribbean Cruise Line. During my time there as Senior Executive Chef I met my lovely wife Maria who also worked for RCCL.

For the next 15 years Maria and I traveled the world, living and working in a variety of Countries.

During my career in the hospitality industry I have held the positions of:
Apprentice, Commis de Cuisine, Chef de Partie, Sous Chef, Executive Sous Chef, Executive Chef, Senior Executive Chef, Area Executive Chef, F&B Manager, Owner, Chef Instructor, Program Chair for the English Program at a Culinary College, Program Chair for the Spanish Program at a Culinary College.

I have worked in restaurants, hotels and cruise ships.

I worked in places where I was the only cook, in places where I was leading a staff of a few hundred and in places of any size in between.

I have lived and worked in such places as: Germany, United States, Jamaica, Grenada, US Virgin Islands, Pakistan, Brazil, Argentina, Sweden, Portugal, Italy, France, Singapore, Thailand, Hong Kong, and probably a few more which I cannot remember right now. According to my wife Maria who keeps track of those things, I have lived, worked and/or visited 128 countries in total.

Not bad for a kid who left school before he was 14 years old and, after apprenticeship,  had no further formal education.

During the past 25 years in the hospitality industry my specialty for which companies hired me was to open new ventures or to bring back the former glory that many places had lost. This made for some very hectic and stressful but nevertheless beautiful and exciting years, which I would not want to miss for anything. (The money was great too). I lived mostly in five-star hotels or other high-class accommodations, provided by the companies I worked for. If one works at this level, most companies provide a high-class expatriate package, which can include great amenities for the whole family such as free travel, maid service, company car and chauffeur, free food, drinks, laundry, medical service, etc, etc.

During the past seven years I have worked as a chef instructor at a local culinary college (Le Cordon Bleu, Miami). Life is good, even without the stress and hectic. Sometimes I miss the crazy action, most times I don’t.

Well folks, there you have it. It is all out there, just waiting for you !
All you have to do is work hard, never give up and understand that all beginnings are tough.

Good Luck !  Life is Good !
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Link to pictures of some of the places I worked at over the years.
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Link to more professional background of chef Susser

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hans susser..... 

hans susser 

hans susser five star diamond award 

hans susser, ca 1987 

hans susser, ca 1988 

hans susser, singapore, ca 1984 

hans susser. 1985 

hans susser. buenos aires 

hans susser. ca 1986 

hans susser. rare vacation. at home in cologne. ca 1987 

hans susser. rio de janeiro 

 
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Happy Holiday’s

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Dear Friend’s,

as this year draws to a close, I wish you all a very happy holiday season
and a prosperous, healthy, happy and content new year.
May your God keep you healthy, your love for all good thing’s
growing and your every need’s and wishes come true.
Happy Cooking, Eating & Sharing

Best Regard’s,  Hans Susser

Life is Good !
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Hans Susser
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Love Everyone !

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Watching   THIS VIDEO   should make your day .
Happy sunday  🙂
Life is Good !
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Image Source: Gabriel Angel and Atumn Sunshine

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