curry

Curried Beef And Mushroom Buddha Bowl

>

Curried Beef And Mushroom Buddha Bowl

>
>
>
>
Named for its big, round Buddha belly shape, a “Buddha bowl” can mean different things to different people, but here I am talking about the culinary meaning, which is a one-dish meal consisting of rice or pasta, whole grains, veggies, protein (by way of meat or seafood, beans, tofu, lentils) and a dressing or sauce, even hot or cold cereals, savory with meat and veggies, or cold with fruits or jello.
What they all have in common is that since the name contains the word “Bowl”, it usually features uncomplicated, tasty, satisfying comfort food that is eaten unceremoniously, with just a spoon or fork.
Like so many other foods, because of its simplicity, it usually contains quality ingredients and is highly seasoned, anywhere from very mild to fiery hot.

>
Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
>
>
Click here for more  Curried Dishes  on  ChefsOpinion
>
Click here for more  Bowls  on  ChefsOpinion
>
Click here for more  Beef  on  ChefsOpinion
>
>
>
Click here for a list of  Rice Dishes from around the World
>
Click here for a list of  Fried Rice Dishes
>
Click here for  a list of  Rice Beverages
>
Click here for a list of  Rice Varieties
>
Click here for a list of  Pakistani Rice Dishes

>
>

Curried Beef And Mushroom Buddha Bowl

>

Curried Beef And Mushroom Buddha Bowl

>

Curried Beef And Mushroom Buddha Bowl

>

boneless chicken – 35 cents each

>
>
>

Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

>
>
>

>
>
>
>

Advertisements

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

>
>
The  style of this curry soup has it’s origins in Europe. As I mentioned in previous posts, many decades ago, when I was an apprentice in Europe, “curries” were prepared the European way, nothing at all like “real curries” as they exist in far-away land’s 🙂
Madras curry powder, ground cumin, cream or milk, onion and banana and chicken stock were the main ingredients in our “curries”. They usually contained chicken or shrimp and were thickened with flour, or in the case of soups, with rice or potatoes. Although not in any way “authentic”, they were nevertheless (and still are!) very delicious in their own way.
During the years Maria and I gave regular dinner parties,  we served this soup often and it was always a hit as part of a multi-course meal.
>
Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
>
>
Click here for more  Curry  on  ChefsOpinion
>
>

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

>

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

Curried Pumpkin, Potato And Coconut Soup

>
>
>
Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
>
>
>


>
>
>
>

SINGAPORE NOODLES (SINGAPORE MEI FUN) 新洲米粉, 星洲炒米, 星洲米粉)

>
>
Having  traveled the world long before I moved to Singapore to live and work there in the early 80’s, I remember how much I was looking forward to finally learn how to prepare “real” Singapore Noodles. By then I had enjoyed them in many Chinese restaurants all over the world and they had become a trustworthy (most of the time, anyway) shoe-in if nothing else appealed on the menu to my at that time still rather newfound love of Chinese food . Much to my surprise, there were no Singapore Noodles to be found anywhere 😦
It then did not take me long to find out that Singapore Noodles are NOT a Singaporean dish but have probably been invented years earlier in Hong Kong.
(As far as I know, the verdict of its true origin is still not entirely agreed upon) 🙂
While there are many different variations, the most common one I have encountered in my travels and here in the USA contain rice sticks, curry, scallions, soy, garlic, ginger, vegetables, shrimp and chicken or pork.
The following version is more or less the one I have cooked for many years, only making slight changes to the ingredients if something is not readily available or leftovers beg to be utilized, such as roast pork, squid, bok choy, celery, etc.
>
>
Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
>
>
Click here for more  Asian Style Noodles  on  ChefsOpinion
>
>
>

Singapore Noodles

Singapore Noodles

>

Singapore Noodles

Singapore Noodles

>

Singapore Noodles

Singapore Noodles

>
>
>
Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
>
>
>


>
>
>
>

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers

>
>

Udon,  the Japanese noodle-love of my life !

Apparently, Alison Spiegel (and many others) caught the same love bug) :

( Excerpt from : | By  )
“Ramen may be everyone’s favorite Japanese noodle soup these days, but just because it’s the trendiest doesn’t mean it’s the best. We’re huge fans of ramen — don’t get us a wrong. We could eat ramen for breakfast, lunch, dinner and late night snacks any day of the week, instant or otherwise. But it’s time to get to know other Japanese noodles, like soba and udon. Because they’re made with buckwheat, which is gluten free, soba noodles have gotten their due lately. Udon noodles, however, have been falling by the wayside, and we’re here to tell you why you should give them plenty of attention this winter.

Thick, chewy and ridiculously satisfying, udon noodles are in a league of their own. These long, Japanese wheat noodles are great hot or cold, and with a neutral flavor, they’re an unmatchable foundation for everything from miso soups to curry. In Japan,kake udon is one of the simplest and most common ways to eat these soft yet sturdy noodles. Udon noodles are served in hot dashi, a Japanese broth made with kombu and bonito flakes, and are topped with scallions. They might also come with tempura or fish cakes. Other popular ways to eat udon noodles include yakiudon, in which the noodles are stir-fried, and zaru udon, in which the noodles are served cold with a soy-sauce based dipping sauce. However you eat udon noodles, they will leave you feeling full but not stuffed, comforted but not sluggish, and completely nourished.”

>
All about Udon
<
<

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers


>

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers


>
>
>
Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
>
>
>


>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Bombay Vegetable Omelette

H'LHCF Logo
>

>
Although  most egg dishes which I have encountered in India and Pakistan use hard-boiled eggs, this dish, which I make often when I have some leftover curry sauce in the fridge, seems to capture (for me) the spirit of Indian and Pakistani breakfast dishes I had in hotels and private homes while living (Pakistan) and traveling (India) in both countries 🙂
Serve with naan and / or rice
>
Bon Appetit !   कृपया भोजन का आनंद लीजिये !  (kripyā bhojan kā ānnaṅd lijīyai)
>
>
Link to  “EASY DOES IT # 11 – CURRY”

Link to Naan Recipe
>
Link to Chelo / Polo
>
Link to Rice
>
>

Bombay Vegetable Omelette

Bombay Vegetable Omelette

<

Bombay Vegetables

Bombay Vegetables

>
>
>
Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
>
>
>


>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Curried Beef & Pasta

>
>
Sunday  lunch is supposed to be the highlight of the week, when traditionally the whole family gathers around the dining table for the culinary highlight of the week. So sad to see traditions like that slowly but surely disappear 😦
However, Bella and I keep the tradition alive as best as we can, gathering on my chaise-lounge and enjoying a great lunch while watching a good movie (the movie substituting the lively conversation which is supposed to take place among the family during Sundays lunch).
We do converse though – she begs, upon which I sternly say “don’t beg, which she follows with a moan or bark, followed by me giving her a morsel. Then I have a few bites until she begs again, which is usually as soon as she swallows her bit. And so on, until the meal is finished 🙂
So, here we go, without further ado – today’s lunch :
>
>

Curried Beef & Pasta

Curried Beef & Pasta

>

Curried Beef & Pasta

Curried Beef & Pasta

>

Curried Beef & Pasta

Curried Beef & Pasta

>
>
Preparation :
>
>
To read instructions, hover over picture
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
>
Click here for  Garam Masala  Instructions
>
>
>


>
>
>
>
>
>

EASY DOES IT # 20 – Mushroom / Veggy Curry

>
>
This  dish is an authentic curry from – Miami ???
Authentic Hans’ Cuisine if you will 🙂
The great thing about it is that everybody can do it, it is so simple. Yet, it tastes just as Indian, Malaysian, Indonesian, Thai or from wherever else you want it to be.
Here is my train of thought:
In my personal  opinion, too much emphasis (hopeful maybe, pretentious and false often) is put on the label “authentic”. I have traveled the far corners of this earth many times over and I have sampled just about any mayor cuisine there is. Each one has usually THREE kinds of authenticity:

First – the traditional, well established, well-known dishes which are passed on by professional cooks from generation to generation,  served in rich and /or noble households without the economic need to compromise on any of the ingredients or procedures.

Second – the traditional dishes served in ordinary households and restaurants, changed sometimes heavily over generations because of changes of personal taste, economic situations and ease / difficulty of preparation.

Third – the food which is served to travelers in local restaurants abroad and in  ethnic restaurants outside of the foods country of origin, which has been altered beyond recognition to confirm to the taste and customs of foreigners in order to make it more attractive to the uninitiated and sell it more easily.

I am of course the biggest fan of “authentic cuisine” if it is available, but unfortunately, this is easier said than done since “authentic ethnic food”  is very difficult to find in most places. So, the alternative to most of us is two-fold: Feast on generic concoctions of good sounding, badly executed, at best mediocre quality food in ridiculously overpriced restaurants (mostly these day’s), or try to do the best you can at home, with the help of proper advise and a lot of practice.

This featured curry will help you to achieve that “authentic” taste at home, without spending a fortune on a million of exotic ingredients and without spending hours of labor in the kitchen.
So, enjoy “Hans’ Authentic Curry” and relax 🙂
.

.
P.S.
However, if you do find that authentic place, hold on to it and give me the address 🙂

.>
Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
>

Link to  “Easy Does It # 11 – Curry & Garam Masala”


>

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

>

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

>
>
Preparation :
>
>

saute mushroom in ghee or butter until starting to lightly brown

saute mushroom in ghee or butter until starting to lightly brown

>

add onions and peppers (or other veggies of your choice)

add onions and peppers (or other veggies of your choice)

>

add garam masala (see link on this page)

add “Garam Masala” (see link on this page) and garlic paste

>

add half Hans' Easy Does It curry sauce" (see link on this page) and half  vegetable stock, simmer until vegetables are cooked

add half Hans’ Easy Does It Curry Sauce” (see link on this page) and half vegetable stock, simmer until vegetables are cooked

>

add coconut cream, tomatoes and lots of chopped cilantro, simmer three more minutes or until sauce has desired texture, check / adjust seasoning

add coconut cream, tomatoes and lots of chopped cilantro, simmer three more minutes or until sauce has desired texture, check / adjust seasoning

>

to serve, Put steamed basmati rice in center, add curry, sprinkle with chives

to serve, put steamed basmati rice in center, add curry, sprinkle with chives

>

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

>

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

Mushroom / Veggy Curry

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Easy Does It # 11 – Curry

.
>
Dear  Friend’s,
Although most of my followers are culinary professionals, there is also a large segment of followers who are just starting to enjoy cooking on a slightly higher than basic level. I have therefore decided to publish, under the moniker “Easy Does It“,  from time to time some very basic recipe variations of dishes which otherwise might seem complicated to some folks. I will break them down to the easiest, most simple instructions, so that those of you who are intimidated by elaborate recipes will be able to prepare these dishes properly, adjusted to your taste and liking, right from the get-go.
Enjoy :-)
>

There  is a great mystery and misconception surrounding a “proper” Indian, Thai, Malay or Indonesian curry. We are to believe that it is too complicated to be attempted by a less than perfect cook, that you will need 101 ingredients, that the ingredients are hard to find, etc, etc.
Now, while a proper curry can be all that and more, “Easy Does It ” is here to help you find a solution to the difficulties of preparing good food.
I am a huge fan of proper Indian and asian Cooking, curries in particular. I have lived in and visited all of the above mentioned countries (and many more) and although I have learned a lot about the local cuisines, I have never become an expert in any one of them. For my private enjoyment I have rather searched and mostly found preparations which will closely resemble some of my favorite exotic dishes but which I can easily prepare at home without getting a shopping cart full of unusual, expensive and hard to find ingredients every time a new craving hits me. Also, please bear in mind that many of the followers of ChefsOpinion live in remote places  and also, not everybody has the means to spend large sums of money on a single meal, yet yearns to taste specialty dishes from around the world.

Here now is a curry sauce which I truly believe will give you that “authentic” taste of India if you add a bit of love and passion while you cook it 🙂
( I have learned a very similar recipe from one of my sous chefs, Said, at his home while I was living and working in Karachi,  Pakistan.

The most important ingredient is your garam masala. Please take the time and effort to make it fresh just before you start cooking. It will be so much superior to the store-bought variety that you will probably never buy it in the supermarket again. Rather, buy the whole seeds and keep them airtight in a dark place in individual containers until you use them.

You will need :
Coriander seeds, black cardamom pods, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, bay leaves, peppercorn, small amount of cinnamon bark. Dry roast in pan on low heat until fragrant, about one minute. Put in spice blender until powder fine. Remove to jar, cover airtight.

Next, saute in ghee finely diced onions, garlic paste and grated ginger until onions are soft but not brown, add turmeric, chili powder, salt, a bit of sugar, lots of chopped fresh coriander with stems (cilantro) and lots of chopped, fresh, very ripe tomatoes. Add chopped fresh chili’s according to your tolerance of heat. Simmer for about 30 minutes. There should be enough moisture from the tomatoes so that after 30 minutes you should have a very thick sauce.
You could use this sauce by itself as a dip for naan (as I do), or use it as base for a quick, simple curry of chicken, vegetables, seafood or even beef. I usually make enough for two or three dishes. I let the base /sauce cool and freeze it in individual containers until I use them.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

P.S.
As usual, I have not included measurements, as I firmly believe part of learning how to cook and enjoy food your way at home you must experiment and practice a bit until it tastes just right FOR YOU ! 🙂


Curry

Curry Sauce






Green Lip Mussels, Lai Fen Rice Sticks And Chopped Broccoli Rabe In Red Curry / Coconut Soup

>
>
Last night I wanted to have a spicy snack at around midnight. Had to be quick and easy. Here is what I prepared. It took about 3 minutes of actual prep time and less than 15 minutes from start to finish. (I had some blanched rapini and cooked lai fen in the fridge from yesterday’s lunch and green lips on the half shell in the freezer). What a convenient product fresh frozen seafood is. If you make sure you buy quality merchandise and handle it with care, frozen seafood will make for a great snack or quick meal in no time. This soup was just awesome  🙂
>

Green Lip Mussels, Lai Fen Rice Sticks And Chopped Broccoli Rabe In Red Curry/Coconut Soup

Green Lip Mussels, Lai Fen Rice Sticks And Chopped Broccoli Rabe In Red Curry / Coconut Soup


>


>
>
Ingredient’s :
Green lip mussels,   frozen, on the half shell
Lai fen rice sticks,   cooked, tossed with sesame oil
Rapini,   blanched, coarsely chopped
Clam juice,
Coconut milk,
Tomato,   chopped
Onion,   julienned
Chilis,   julienned
Scallions,   sliced
Almonds,   slivered
Limes,   juiced
Curry powder,
Turmeric,
Garlic,    paste
Ginger,   grated
Fish sauce,
Red curry paste,   canned
Maggi seasoning,
Scotch bonnet sauce,
Kosher salt,
Peanut oil,   to saute

Method :

Saute onions in peanut oil until translucent, add tomatoes and chilis, saute for one minute. Add curry paste, garlic, ginger, curry powder, turmeric and almonds and saute until fragrant. Add all other ingredients except mussels, noodles and cilantro and simmer for 7 minutes. Strain. Add mussels and noodles. Return to heat until heated through. Remove from heat.  Add fish sauce and scotch bonnet sauce to taste  (be careful with the fermented fish sauce, check  HERE   first).  To serve, top with cilantro.
>
>
Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog, please be so kind and click on the video below.  ( You don’t have to watch it, just click once )   Thank you 🙂
>
>
>
>

Pigs Tail And Potato Curry, Naan & Cucumber Raita

>

>
Some folks are probably scratching their head, going “WTF” (what he food 🙂 ) when reading this. But hey, I love pigs tail and curries of any style.

Pigs tails – not everybody’s cup of tea                                read about Pigs Tail
Real curries – everybody loves those                                  read about Real Curries
European style curries – if you grew up with them…….. read about “European Style” Curries

The good thing is that if you don’t love pig’s tails, you can replace them with any other protein or vegetables.
However, here is what went on in my kitchen for today’s lunch:
>

Pigs Tail And Potato Curry, Naan & Cucumber Raita

Pigs Tail And Potato Curry, Naan & Cucumber Raita

>


>
Curry :

Pigs tails,   cut into pieces
Potatoes,   peeled, cut into wedges
Bananas,   sliced,
Baby carrots,
Peppers,   diced,
Celery,   sliced
Tomato,   diced
Ginger,   grated
Garlic,   paste
Cilantro,   chopped
Vegetable stock,
Coconut milk,
Turmeric,
Curry powder,
Kosher salt,
Cayenne pepper,
Butter,

Saute pigs tails in butter until lightly browned, add vegetables, banana, garlic and ginger and saute until fragrant. Add curry and turmeric, saute for another minute. Add stock, salt and pepper and very slowly simmer until pigs tails are tender. Add coconut milk and potatoes and simmer until potatoes are done but still firm. Adjust seasoning if necessary. To serve, sprinkle curry with plenty of coarsely chopped cilantro.

Naan :

1/2 cup   water,
1 pck yeast
2.5 cup  a/p  flour,
1/4 cup vegetable oil,
1/3 cup greek yogurt,
1 lg egg
Salt

Combine yeast, sugar and water. Stir to dissolve, let sit for a few minutes or until it is frothy on top. At that point, stir in the oil, yogurt and egg until evenly combined.

In another bowl, combine the flour with the salt. Add the bowl of wet ingredients to the flour/salt mixture and stir until well mixed. Continue adding flour a half cup at a time until you can no longer stir it with a spoon (about 1 to 1.5 cups later).

Turn the ball of dough out onto a well floured counter top. Knead the ball of dough for about 3 minutes, adding flour as necessary to keep the dough from sticking. The dough should be smooth and very soft but not sticky.

Loosely cover the dough and let it rise until double in size (about 45 minutes). After it rises, gently flatten the dough and cut it into 8 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a small ball by stretching the dough back under itself until the top is smooth and round.

Heat a large, heavy bottomed skillet over medium heat and spray lightly with non-stick spray. Working with one ball at a time, roll it out until it is about 1/4 inch thick or approximately 6 inches in diameter. Place the rolled out dough onto the hot skillet and cook until the under side is golden brown and large bubbles have formed on the surface (see photos below). Flip the dough and cook the other side until golden brown as well. Serve plain or brushed with melted butter and sprinkled with herbs!
>
>

For Raita Recipe, click here
.
>
Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

>
>
>
>