miso

Beef Udon (Niku Udon) 肉うどん

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Beef Udon (Niku Udon) 肉うどん

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Very few beautiful, heart and belly-warming dishes are as easy to prepare as these beef-noodles. At times I have eaten the noodles just with broth, at other times I have eaten the meat just by itself or over steamed rice. Any way I choose, I enjoy each one of them, but of course, the whole schamuckas as shown on this page is the very best of them. 🙂
I especially love the simplicity of the preparation. Hot broth, udon noodles and caramelized beef and caramelized scallions and voilà – culinary heaven has been reached ! 🙂
(In Japan, one usually adds a few slices of fish cake ( Narutomaki ), but I can do without that……..
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Udon  on  ChefsOpinion 
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Click here for more  Beef  on  ChefsOpinion
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Beef Udon (Niku Udon) 肉うどん

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Beef Udon (Niku Udon) 肉うどん

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Beef Udon (Niku Udon) 肉うどん

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Caramelized Beef only

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Udon in Broth only

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers

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Udon,  the Japanese noodle-love of my life !

Apparently, Alison Spiegel (and many others) caught the same love bug) :

( Excerpt from : | By  )
“Ramen may be everyone’s favorite Japanese noodle soup these days, but just because it’s the trendiest doesn’t mean it’s the best. We’re huge fans of ramen — don’t get us a wrong. We could eat ramen for breakfast, lunch, dinner and late night snacks any day of the week, instant or otherwise. But it’s time to get to know other Japanese noodles, like soba and udon. Because they’re made with buckwheat, which is gluten free, soba noodles have gotten their due lately. Udon noodles, however, have been falling by the wayside, and we’re here to tell you why you should give them plenty of attention this winter.

Thick, chewy and ridiculously satisfying, udon noodles are in a league of their own. These long, Japanese wheat noodles are great hot or cold, and with a neutral flavor, they’re an unmatchable foundation for everything from miso soups to curry. In Japan,kake udon is one of the simplest and most common ways to eat these soft yet sturdy noodles. Udon noodles are served in hot dashi, a Japanese broth made with kombu and bonito flakes, and are topped with scallions. They might also come with tempura or fish cakes. Other popular ways to eat udon noodles include yakiudon, in which the noodles are stir-fried, and zaru udon, in which the noodles are served cold with a soy-sauce based dipping sauce. However you eat udon noodles, they will leave you feeling full but not stuffed, comforted but not sluggish, and completely nourished.”

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All about Udon
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Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers


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Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers

Udon Noodles With Tenderloin Tips And Bell Peppers


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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Easy Does It # 6 – Express Ramen

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Dear  Friend’s
Although most of my followers are culinary professionals, there is also a large segment of followers who are just starting to enjoy cooking on a slightly higher than basic level. I have therefore decided to publish, under the moniker “Easy Does It“,  from time to time some very basic recipe variations of dishes which otherwise might seem complicated to some folks. I will break them down to the easiest, most simple instructions, so that those of you who are intimidated by elaborate recipes will be able to prepare these dishes properly, adjusted to your taste and liking, right from the get-go.
Enjoy :-)
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In  the foodie world everybody act’s as if  ramen  has been invented yesterday morning. In reality, it has been around forever, being a very special and revered dish in it’s original form. However, since the instant variety has been invented, it has been the stable of millions of students and other young folks around the world. It is simple to prepare, costs only pennies and is filling and tasty.
I have made many different types of  ramen soups over the past few decades, starting out with the instant form as a young kid. Gradually I started adding “stuff” to my soups, roast pork, chicken, beef, any kind of seafood, herbs, vegetables, cooked eggs, whisked eggs, poached eggs, you name it, it has found its way into my ramen. But even when I make it from scratch, I still use store bought ramen noodles. Some Asian specialty shops have good quality ramen, so if you can, splurge a little  on quality. In a pinch, angel hair pasta cooked  al dente,  with a bit of baking soda added to the water, is a reasonable fine substitute.
However, today I want to show you how to make a simple ramen from the instant variety. Discard the seasoning packages that comes in the packs. Use a good home made pork stock (substitute with chicken stock if you prefer), season with  miso,  grated ginger, garlic paste, sea salt, soy sauce, sesame oil and sake.

Bon Appetit !    どうぞめしあがれ  (Douzo Meshiagare)
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to serve, add egg yolk to the soup (substitute with cooked egg if you prefer)

to serve, add egg yolk to the soup (substitute with cooked egg if you prefer)

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Express Ramen

Express Ramen

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