japanese food

Chirashizushi -Unagi Kabayaki & Ebi

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Chirashizushi . In my book, sushi does not get better than that!
I am of course aware of the fact that I am in the absolute minority with this opinion, but I just can’t get myself to join the millions of fans of raw fish, so this version of Chirashizushi is my very own ticket to sushi heaven 🙂
Great quality / perfectly cooked sushi-rice with smoked eel , poached shrimp and a chili-soy-yuzu dipping sauce – there you go, baby, sushi perfection without the fuss and sky-high price tag of “the other perfect sushi”.
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Please note that some Chirashizushi dishes contain raw fish.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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How to prepare perfect Sushi Rice
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More Chirashizushi
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Chirashizushi -Unagi Kabayaki & Ebi

Chirashizushi -Unagi Kabayaki & Ebi

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Chirashizushi -Unagi Kabayaki & Ebi

Chirashizushi -Unagi Kabayaki & Ebi

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Easy Does It # 6 – Express Ramen

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Dear  Friend’s
Although most of my followers are culinary professionals, there is also a large segment of followers who are just starting to enjoy cooking on a slightly higher than basic level. I have therefore decided to publish, under the moniker “Easy Does It“,  from time to time some very basic recipe variations of dishes which otherwise might seem complicated to some folks. I will break them down to the easiest, most simple instructions, so that those of you who are intimidated by elaborate recipes will be able to prepare these dishes properly, adjusted to your taste and liking, right from the get-go.
Enjoy :-)
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In  the foodie world everybody act’s as if  ramen  has been invented yesterday morning. In reality, it has been around forever, being a very special and revered dish in it’s original form. However, since the instant variety has been invented, it has been the stable of millions of students and other young folks around the world. It is simple to prepare, costs only pennies and is filling and tasty.
I have made many different types of  ramen soups over the past few decades, starting out with the instant form as a young kid. Gradually I started adding “stuff” to my soups, roast pork, chicken, beef, any kind of seafood, herbs, vegetables, cooked eggs, whisked eggs, poached eggs, you name it, it has found its way into my ramen. But even when I make it from scratch, I still use store bought ramen noodles. Some Asian specialty shops have good quality ramen, so if you can, splurge a little  on quality. In a pinch, angel hair pasta cooked  al dente,  with a bit of baking soda added to the water, is a reasonable fine substitute.
However, today I want to show you how to make a simple ramen from the instant variety. Discard the seasoning packages that comes in the packs. Use a good home made pork stock (substitute with chicken stock if you prefer), season with  miso,  grated ginger, garlic paste, sea salt, soy sauce, sesame oil and sake.

Bon Appetit !    どうぞめしあがれ  (Douzo Meshiagare)
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to serve, add egg yolk to the soup (substitute with cooked egg if you prefer)

to serve, add egg yolk to the soup (substitute with cooked egg if you prefer)

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Express Ramen

Express Ramen

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Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog, please be so kind and click on the video on the bottom of this page.
(You don’t have to watch it, just click once)   Thank you 🙂
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Tonkatsu & Dipping Sauce

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Tonkatsu !  Sounds exotic and foreign ?
Rightfully so. However, tonkatsu is a common japanese dish, usually served with shredded cabbage and a worcester based dipping sauce. But, if you take the japanese name and replace it with the english name, what you get is ” breaded pork cutlet”.
In this version I have used a pork chop instead of pork cutlets and have omitted the shredded cabbage. Anyway, I usually prefer vinaigrette dressed shredded iceberg lettuce instead of the cabbage. I also use my own modified tonkatsu sauce recipe which I prefer to any store bought version.
But, can you still call it Tonkatsu ?  You be the judge 🙂
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Tonkatsu & Dipping Sauce

Tonkatsu & Dipping Sauce

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Tonkatsu :

Season the pork chops with kosher salt, cayenne pepper and lemon juice. Bread with flour, egg and panko bread crumbs. Saute in peanut oil until golden and cooked through, but not dry. Remove to absorbent paper and pat dry. Let rest for five minutes before cutting into wide strips. Serve with dipping sauce and lemon wedges. Enjoy !

Tonkatsu sauce  (my way) :

Mix 1/2 cup ketchup, 2 tblsp soy sauce, 1 tsp garlic paste, 1 tsp mustard, 1 tblsp white wine (or sherry), 1 tsp sriracha and a few drops of maggi seasoning.

Note :

I love this dipping sauce and use it for lot’s of other fried, grilled and sauted dishes.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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” Vegetarian Yaki Udon “

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There are literally thousands of different types of pasta available to us, not including the many types we are able to easily make ourself at home.
If I ever had to pick  THE ONE, THE ONLY  pasta for that lonely island I’d be stuck at for a long time,  together with the only song (Kashmir), the only woman (Maria), the only drink (Iced Tea) and the only book ( So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, by Douglas Adams) , it would definitely be “Udon”.
In my opinion, udon is the ultimate , most versatile, most satisfying pasta. Readily available in most asian food stores, either fresh or frozen, udon is a great culinary delight. Their ability to hold on to any sauces they are paired with makes them the ideal slurping pasta for a comfortable, homy meal. Last night, this is how I used udon for dinner :

” Vegetarian Yaki Udon ”
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Listen to  Kashmir 🙂

Another udon dish I prepared at home, this one with protein.

Yaki Udon Video
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Bon Appetit !    Life is Good !
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