schocking

Shrimp & Glass Noodle – Salad

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Glass noodles are the ideal canvas for pasta salad. They keep their texture even when kept as leftovers for a few days, which is perfect when you live alone and usually cook way too much for one meal, (as I do), even with a dog who will eat it’s fair share of whatever I cook 🙂
I like to prepare glass noodle salad with a dressing of kosher salt, cayenne pepper or sriracha, rice-vinegar, peanut oil, sesame oil, garlic paste, grated ginger, a tiny amount of sugar, cilantro and/or scallions. As for other ingredients, I sometimes add chicken, seafood, beef or duck, as well as any vegetables hanging-out in my fridge.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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All about  Glass Noodles
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More Glass Noodles on ChefsOpinion
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Shrimp & Glass Noodle - Salad

Shrimp & Glass Noodle – Salad

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Shrimp & Glass Noodle - Salad

Shrimp & Glass Noodle – Salad

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures

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DiverXO – Perversion Of The Good Kind

 

 

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Image Property of DiverXO

Image Property of DiverXO

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This kind of food does not appeal to me much on a regular basis, mostly because it is usually done badly, but in this particular environment with this particular company and service I am sure I would have a blast (as long as nobody pulls out a cellphone/camera 🙂
Decadent, exciting, sexy video 🙂
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CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO
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Too Much “Freshness” ???

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Too Much "Freshness"   ???

Too Much “Freshness” ???

Watch the  VIDEO HERE
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When is too much too much ?
Do you think this is eaten in this way because of the ultimate freshness ?
Or for the novelty effect ? ( Probably)

You’ll be the judge 😦 🙂
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” Word’s to ponder “

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“A home cook who relies too much on a recipe is sort of like a pilot who reads the plane’s instruction manual while flying.”
Alton Brown

” What my mother believed about cooking is that if you worked hard and prospered, someone else would do it for you.”
Nora Ephron

“Give a man a fish and he has food for a day; teach him how to fish and you can get rid of him of the entire weekend.”
– Zenna Schaffer

” My wife dresses to kill. She cooks the same way. “
– Henry Youngman

“Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them.” 
– Samuel Butler

“Get the F…  out of my kitchen”
Hans Susser,  on many occasion’s.
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” Sexist Vintage Ads: 45 Vintage Ads Targeting Husbands And Wives “

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I found this mind boggling.
How far has our society (most of it anyway) come in a few short decades.
We can laugh about it now, but back then …….
Enjoy this, but take it with a grain of salt  🙂
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Image source: AMUSING PLANET


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More Vintage Sexist Ad’s found on AMUSING PLANET:

45 Vintage Sexist Ads That Wouldn’t Go Down Well Today
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Life is Good !   Especially now   🙂
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” Why would anyone EVER EVER EVER use those crappy pre packaged corn taco shells ???? Yeesh !!! “

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Dear Friend’s
In response to my post :  ”  Tacos Al Camaron ” ,
the following esteemed comment was posted by a young lady who obviously knows and loves her food and with whom I basically wholeheartedly agree :

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”  Why would anyone EVER EVER EVER use those crappy pre packaged corn taco shells???? Yeesh!  “

Dear Friend’s
In response to my post : ” Tacos Al Camaron ” ,
the following esteemed comment was posted by a young lady who obviously knows and loves her food and with whom I basically wholeheartedly agree :
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” Why would anyone EVER EVER EVER use those crappy pre-packaged corn taco shells???? Yeesh! “

Whilst I agree with the reader that freshly made tacos are (usually) a tremendous improvement over ready-made products, my reply below should help to clarify a bit about how and why I enjoy food the way I do and most of all, how and why I choose the content I put on my Blog :

Dear disgusted reader of ChefsOpinion. First, let me assure you that I agree with you inasmuch that ” freshly made anything” is usually better than crappy ” store bought anything “.

Although I am in no way an expert on Mexican food, I’d like to tell you that I lived for a year in Mexico while I was married for the first time, back in the seventies.
Then In the early 2000’s, I went back to Mexico, where I was in charge of the food operation’s (at the same time) of three high-class boutique hotels, as well as one five-star Westin hotel and one four-star Sheraton hotel, all in the Yukatan, Mexico.
I am a huge fan of Mexican food and have certainly had my share of the good, the bad and the ugly.
I have had the finest tacos in the best restaurants and in the grimmest joints and at any place in between.
I have taught hundreds of cooks and thousands of culinary students about tacos, tortillas, flautas, burritos, you name it, I’ve done it.
However, when it comes to ChefsOpinion, I try to have a good time with like-minded folks who “GET IT”.
Good food is what we enjoy to eat; What is practical at the moment, what makes economic sense and what’s the best you can do whilst your time is extremely limited.
What I try to do on my blog is to share and discuss food and food-related issues with a broad range of folk’s, from culinary students to hobby cooks to perfectionists.
Also with old warrior’s like myself, who have seen it all and done it all, who are maybe just a bit more tolerant to situations where we must substitute with a lesser ingredient for some reason, or when we are just too damn exhausted to move another finger.
If I had a choice I would eat and drink only the best, freshest, most refined, most exquisite food and drinks available.
While I was privileged to live in that ideal world for most of my professional life, there were and there are situations when a sudden lust for a specific food or drink can sometimes require a quick fix just to take care of that overwhelming craving.
I have been immersed in this wonderful world of food service for 45 years. I have been in charge of meals for kings and queens, heads of states, the famous and not so famous. I am certainly aware of quality and perfection for which we should strife whenever possible. However, at this point in my life, I have just started a new job which keeps me away from my home for 11 hours. I live alone with my dear dog Bella, so before I take off for work at 5.00 am, there are already two solid hours of me getting ready for work, taking care of Bella for an hour, walking her, playing with her, trying to keep her from chasing the neighbors cat’s, etc.
When I come home at 5.00pm, my first priority is to take Bella for a long walk.
Then on to take care of the blog, usually for about three hours. Then cooking dinner, taking pic’s of the food for the next post, enjoying dinner, cleaning the kitchen, walking Bella for another hour. By the time I finally get to rest it is usually 12.30 am.

So then, please, forgive me for using pre-made tacos (They were actually very good, all things considered). The folks who will use the pre-made stuff will enjoy a quick and easy to follow food inspiration. The folks who are a bit more dedicated to only the best will no doubt spent the extra time and effort to produce awesome fresh tacos.
Hopefully, in the end, “Life is Good” for everybody. 🙂

So then :
Why would anyone EVER EVER EVER use those crappy pre-packaged corn taco shells???? Yeesh!

Because sometimes………

P.S.
Have you noted the store bought! mayo in the picture ? Yeesh! 🙂
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” What Is A Real BBQ ?! ” Part 1

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In my humble opinion,

these days’ the word BBQ means different things to different people.
I have lately come to the conclusion that to the majority of folk’s BBQ describes a social gathering of one or more people, the main purpose is to cook out in the open, enjoy the weather, food and company. (Even BBQ restaurant’s used to cook their food outside).
Since each region, restaurant, family and grill cook swears that their version (smoking, grilling, open fire, covered grill, etc) is the gospel, describing BBQ as a cooking method seems rather futile to me .
However, I had many a chef getting his / her knickers in a twist discussing what BBQ actually and REALLY means, so I just accept whatever is the explanation of the day.
( Even the origin of the word Barbecue seems to have different proponents ).
If I take my classical french training into consideration, you have the cooking methods :
Grilling (never covered), Smoking (always covered) Jerking ( a combination cooking metod, since we grill, smoke and steam at the same time) and “the way of Life BBQ”, where we use any cooking method traditionally employed in our area and / or backyard, invite a bunch of friend’s and family over and have smoked, grilled, jerked food, maybe a barrel of beer and lot’s of fun.
BBQ – happy cooking outside, whichever way, as long as you are having fun !    🙂
Please give us your opinion in the poll below.

Live is Good !


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Brussels Grill: Mixed vegetables

Brussels Grill: Mixed vegetables (Photo credit: batigolix)

Beef and Corn on a Charcoal BBQ grill

Beef and Corn on a Charcoal BBQ grill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some chicken, pork and corn in the barbeque

Some chicken, pork and corn in the barbeque (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: a typical offset bbq smoker

English: a typical offset bbq smoker (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Image of a propane smoker in use. Dia...

English: Image of a propane smoker in use. Diagrams the elements. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Preparing grill for grilling, grill w...

English: Preparing grill for grilling, grill with flames and cones. Česky: Příprava grilu pro grilování, gril s plameny a šiškami. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Chicken wings being cooked slowly ove...

English: Chicken wings being cooked slowly over charcoal ashes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: "Little Chief" food smoker,...

English: “Little Chief” food smoker, popular in the Pacific Northwest for home smoking of fish and meat (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pork steaks cooking over a charcoal fire

Pork steaks cooking over a charcoal fire (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A barbecue on a trailer at a block pa...

English: A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. Pans on the top shelf hold hamburgers and hot dogs that were grilled earlier when the coals were hot. The lower grill is now being used to slowly cook pork ribs and “drunken chicken”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Can't claim credit for this cooking, my friend...

Can’t claim credit for this cooking, my friend Paul was responsible. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a traditional asado. The picture shows...

This is a traditional asado. The picture shows ribs grilled in the traditional Argentinean way. The meat is on top of the grill and the charcoal or wood at low fire under the grill. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deutsch: Bratwürste auf einem Grill

Deutsch: Bratwürste auf einem Grill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Español: Cocinando carne para hamburguesa al g...

Español: Cocinando carne para hamburguesa al grill. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Barbecue

Barbecue (Photo credit: Johann Richard)

The smoking setup - left

The smoking setup – left (Photo credit: ntang)

Pork ribs being smoked

Pork ribs being smoked (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cooks remove racks of herring from a tradition...

Cooks remove racks of herring from a traditional smokehouse (Heringsräucherei) (Photo credit: drakegoodman)

English: Barbecue grill trailer and church, In...

English: Barbecue grill trailer and church, Index, Washington. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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I Don’t Like Sushi ! I Adore Sushi Rice !

Image Source : Recipefinder

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I don’t like seaweed, raw fish or artificial crabmeat.

My wife on the other hand loves what she calls sushi and I call crap.
Because of her love for the stuff, we go relatively often for her to enjoy it. Now, because she prefers the little strip mall joint’s around where we live, that’s where we usually go. I am fully aware that there are a few outstanding quality sushi places around, but you won’t be getting your fix there for $15 to $25, which is about average around here per person for a meal of “rice and stuff “as I call it. So at this point I would be happy with a bowl of perfect sushi rice with some smoked mackerel. I make that for myself at homes many times..
The problem is, it is hard to come by good sushi rice at most sushi places, especially the ones in strip mall’s, usually labeled something like : “Sushi Thai”, “Sushi Chinese”, “Sushi anything
If you can not attract enough customers with the quality of your sushi and have to add other, completely different ethnic cuisines to your restaurant, chances are there is something wrong. The biggest problem in my humble opinion is the fact that most customers have never had excellent or even good  “sushi”. What they usually had is a roll of badly seasoned rice, with more inferior quality ingredients added, then pressed into a dense roll or chunk of rice, , which then will proceed to be dunked into a soy / substitute-wasabi bath which covers whatever little taste and texture there was of rice and other ingredients in the first place. It will also soggy up the toasted nori, which is supposed to be crispy when it hit’s your mouth.

But, that’s a good thing, because now everybody is happy !
1)
The owner of the restaurant: The has sold a lot of cheap rice and some artificial crabmeat, canned mayo, third class mostly wrongly labeled raw and many times contaminated fish,
( stomach flu anyone? ) Which gives him a food cost of maybe 10 – 15 % . If that much!
2)
The customer : He got exactly what he or she expected. Never been exposed to the real stuff, there is no way of knowing what crap (as far a sushi goes) was just consumed. But, the customer is full, (all that tightly squeezed rice), and feels sooo sophisticated, having just demonstrated his or her foodie-ness by eating raw fish with Chopsticks, for all to see.
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The supplier, of which many, as recent surveys prove, have mislabeled part or all of their supply in order to get a higher price for a inferior product.

As for the raw fish, condiments and sauces, those will require a separate post.

In the meantime : Fresh? Frozen? Never been frozen? Safely handled? Yeah, right!
I believe most folks would not put raw fish I their mouth if they would understand the dangers associated with it and amplified a thousand fold by uneducated and / or careless food workers.

The FDA has never created a category of “sushi grade fish.” It’s a marketing gimmick. The FDA has created regulations governing
fish that is to be served raw:
# (A) Except as specified in ¶ (B) of this section, before service or sale in ready-to-eat form, raw, raw-marinated, partially cooked, or marinated-partially cooked fish other than molluscan
shellfish shall be:

* (1) Frozen and stored at a temperature of -20°C (-4°F) or below for 168 hours (7 days) in a freezer; or

* (2) Frozen at -35°C (-31°F) or below until solid and stored at -35°C (-31°F) for 15 hours.

(B) If the fish are tuna of the species Thunnus alalunga, Thunnus albacares (Yellowfin tuna), Thunnus atlanticus, Thunnus maccoyii (Bluefin tuna, Southern), Thunnus obesus (Bigeye tuna), or Thunnus thynnus (Bluefin tuna, Northern), the fish may be served or sold in a raw, raw-marinated, or partially cooked ready-to-eat form without freezing as specified under ¶ (A) of this section.

Now for the good part:

If the customer is happy with a belly full of ordinary rice and some other stuff for meal that usually cost’s around $15 to $20, good for him / her.
You usually get what you pay for when it comes to sushi, and the fact is that most so called sushi places outside of Japan are Crap (when it comes to sushi) However, if you don’t know the real stuff and you are happy what you get for the money, more power to you.
Here are a few tip’s to achieve good quality sushi :

1)

One of the most important element of sushi-making is the cooking of the rice. It’s so important, in fact, that future sushi chefs in Japan spend the first two of their seven years of formal training learning to master this step. If possible, buy only the best quality Japanese short-grain sushi rice.
Other types of rice contain lower levels of amylose (the sugar found in rice grains) and will not achieve the required sticky texture.
Here are some of my favorite brands:  Kokuho Rose and Nishiki, but you can also opt for Koshihikari Premium or Tamanishiki.
If they are not available in your area, buy them online, it’s certainly worth the extra money and time .

2)

Sushi rice is processed for packaging with added rice starch powders (and sometimes talc), so it’s essential to wash off this residue before cooking to avoid ending up with a pasty, goopy mess.

Start by measuring the rice according to your recipe.
Next, transfer the rice to a fine-mesh sieve. Set the sieve inside a large mixing bowl that you’ve placed in your sink, and run cold water over the rice until the water reaches the top of the sieve. Turn off the tap and swish the rice around in the sieve until the water becomes cloudy. Lift out the sieve, drain the cloudy water, and return the sieve to the bowl, refilling it with fresh water.
Repeat this rinsing process three or four times until the remaining water is 90 percent clear, and then let the rice drain for 15 minutes.
This may seem like a lot of advance work, but Japanese legend says there are seven gods living in each rice grain,
So, treat your rice with respect !

3)

When it comes to cooking sushi rice, there’s a fine line between perfectly puffed grains and edible glue. Here is a guideline :
(The amount of minutes and liquid might vary slightly, depending on the brand of rice you are using). I recommend you experiment with different brands to find out which is your favorite, then make a few test batches and note down precisely the measurements, times and heat settings. If you’re using a rice cooker, just place the washed and drained rice into the cooker along with the appropriate amount of water, turn it on, and you’re all set. If you’re using a pot, follow a 1-to-1 ratio for sushi rice to water and bring the mixture to a boil. Once it has reached a boil, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting, and cook the rice for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, turn off the heat entirely and let the rice sit and steam in the pot, covered, for 10 more minutes. Whatever you do, do not peek!
Although we have a electric rice cooker at home, I always use a heavy pot.

4)

Shari-zu, a blend of sugar, salt, and rice vinegar, is the key to perfectly seasoned sushi rice. When stocking ingredients, remember to select unseasoned rice vinegar (steer clear of the pre-seasoned variety) so you can control the amount of sugar and salt. To make enough shari-zu for 2 cups of raw sushi rice, whisk together 4 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar with 8 teaspoons sugar and 1 teaspoon salt until dissolved. I know of some chefs who add a big amount of kombu to their shari-zu, which for me is wrong in so many way’s. Kombu is kelp, it has a strong sea-flavor. (Sea flavor – fish flavor). I don’t want anything I eat to smell strongly like fish, the least my sushi rice, which should taste slightly sweetish, slightly vinegary and otherwise just like rice,  but definitely not fishy !

Transfer the cooked sushi rice to a hangiri (a Japanese cedar rice tub) or a wooden bowl. A stainless steel or glass dish will also do the trick, but wood is best because it absorbs moisture from the rice. Use a rice paddle or wooden spoon to spread out the rice and break up any big clumps, and then drizzle it with the shari-zu. Fold the rice over itself to fully incorporate the shari-zu, but be careful not to mash the grains. Traditionally, you would have an assistant fanning the rice as you fold it (you can use an electric fan), but whether or not you have a helping hand, the goal is to continue folding the rice until it stops releasing steam. Once you’ve reached this point, cover the rice with a damp towel as you prepare your fillings.

5)

Less is always more when it comes to fillings, so as you plan what to wrap up in your roll, think minimal and trade America’s all-you-can eat mentality for a refined and balanced Japanese aesthetic. Thin strips of cucumbers, scallions, daikon radishes, avocado, and other veggies are suitable for sushi, as are prepared seafood such as crabmeat, smoked salmon, cooked wild shrimp, and cooked eel. You’ll want a total of about 1 pound of fillings to make 10 maki (roughly 1/4 pound each of crabmeat, avocado, salmon, and cucumbers, for example). Cut ingredients into long, thin strips about the size of a pencil.

6)

Sushi-making is a fun and creative process that works best in a well-organized work space. Begin by wrapping a bamboo sushi-rolling mat in plastic wrap, for efficient cleanup later. Set aside halved sheets of nori on a waterproof surface, and place a platter or plate nearby to serve as a clean landing spot for your finished rolls. Mix up some pungent wasabi by combining 2 tablespoons of wasabi powder with just enough water to make a thick paste. Finally, fill a small bowl with warm water and add a splash of unseasoned rice vinegar. This mixture, known as te-zu, is used to dip your hands in before handling the rice. Don’t skip the te-zu step, or you’ll end up with rice-coated hands, making it hard to cleanly roll out your sushi.

7)

Once you’ve set up your sushi-making station, begin preparing your first roll by laying your rolling mat in front of you with the bars parallel to the table’s edge. With a dry hand, lay a half sheet of nori on the bottom edge of the mat, dip both hands into the te-zu, and shake off any excess (your hands should be only slightly damp). Pick up a handful of rice about the size of a tennis ball and gently spread it over the nori without smearing or mashing the rice too firmly. Spread the rice evenly, especially the left and right edges. For an extra kick, run a tiny dab of wasabi paste along the center of the rice.

Place one to three types of fillings horizontally beside the wasabi, remembering not to overfill your maki. Roll the mat and the nori up and over to lock in the fillings then release the mat and use it again to finish rolling the remaining nori. Once you’re ready to serve your rolls, dampen your knife (a sharp chef’s knife works well) with te-zu. The vinegar mixture will prevent your knife from sticking to the rice as you then cut the rolls into 1-inch slices.

8)

Sushi should always be made and enjoyed fresh. Seasoning sushi rice with shari-zu actually thwarts bacterial growth by altering the rice’s pH, so freshly made rolls can sit out for a few hours, but don’t push it. Refrigeration can destroy sushi’s delicate flavors and textures, so try to prepare your rolls as close to serving time as possible. Nori gets soggy quickly once rolled around damp rice, so sushi chefs will always make maki last. If you absolutely must refrigerate your sushi maki, do so before cutting, and cover the rolls tightly with plastic wrap.

So, wether you like “rice with stuff” or the finest “sushi”, there is a place and a price for you  🙂
Economical (cheap) does not alway’s mean lower quality, but it usually does. Labor cost plays a big part in the equation. A very good sushi chef can make a very good salary and is not easy to find outside of Japan, definitely never for minimum salary. That’s why your sushi chef’s name is usually Pepe, Fritz, James or Chang, who mostly work for much lower salaries as properly trained sushi chefs. After all, hey can be perfectly trained for their job of making “rice with stuff ” in a few day’s, it is easy to take some rice, squeeze the heck out of it so it is easy to handle, roll it up and slice it.
The “Art” of making sushi is on a totally different level of culinary accomplishment. You can feel each grain of rice as it is in your mouth, the taste of the rice very subtle so as not to cover the taste and texture of all the other first rate ingredient’s. Since the rice is perfectly seasoned, there is no need to add soy sauce to it since it then would be too salty. The right amount of wasaby has been added already by your expert chef. That leaves you with the choice of adding a bit more wasabi for your own specific preference, as well as a bit of soy sauce to the fish only !  You will do that by holding the nigiri upside down with your finger and lightly dipping the fish into the sauce. I you would use chopsticks, the rice of the nigiri would most likely fall apart and the protein or vegetable fall of. Therefore it is almost necessary to use your fingers when having nigiri.

Bon ! Appetit !   Life is Good !
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” Bella Went Outside……. “

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This is what Bella said     🙂 

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Bella say’s :  Life is Good ! 

” Cook The Opossum, Spare The Bear “

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I usually don’t like to re-post other folk’s stuff, but this one deserves to be shared  🙂
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From : eatocracy, CNN

Barbecue Digest: Cook the opossum, spare the bear

Editor’s note: All summer long, the Southern Foodways Alliance will be delving deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain old deliciousness of barbecue across the United StatesDig in.

Today’s barbecue joints tend to serve just one or two kinds of meats, with pork predominate in the Carolinas and Georgia and beef the star out in Texas and Kansas City. Not so in the old days.

Back when barbecues were large-scale community affairs, the meat served was whatever people had on hand and could donate to the cause. Lists like the following, from a description of an 1868 barbecue in Spartanburg, South Carolina, were par for the course: “beef, mutton, pork, and fowls were provided in superabundance.”

At the largest events, the menus could be eye-popping. Perhaps the most extensive is the selection served at the 1923 inauguration of Oklahoma governor Jack Walton. The event was held in January, and just before Christmas, Walton sent out a call to Oklahoma farmers to donate animals for the event.

And donate they did. The final tally, as printed in the Dallas Morning News, included thousands of cows, hogs, sheep, and chickens plus 103 turkeys, 1,363 rabbits, 26 squirrels, 134 opossums, 113 geese, 34 ducks, 15 deer, 2 buffalo, and 2 reindeer that had been “shipped in from the North.”

A man from Sayre, Oklahoma, captured a live bear and offered him to the cause, too. But the bear won the sympathy of Oklahoma school children, who pooled their pocket change, bought him for $119.66, and donated him to the Wheeler Park Zoo. The bear was a crowd favorite for more than a decade.

The rest of the animals weren’t so lucky.

Today’s installment comes courtesy of Robert Moss, a food writer and restaurant critic for the Charleston City Paper and author of “Barbecue: the History of an American Institution”. Follow him on Twitter at @mossr.

Delve into more barbecue goodness from the Southern Foodways Alliance blog

Previously – In praise of pork rinds and Give squirrel a whirl and Burgoo with a smidge of squirrel
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