Barbecue

Gratinated Beef, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

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This  must be my 25th different use for beef ribs other than just plain BBQ.
Incidentally, this is also without a doubt one of my best loved way’s to cook beef rib’s.
It is a bit robust for this time of the year here in Florida, but as I said often –
thank’s God for A/C 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

Gratinated Beef Ribs, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef Ribs, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Beef Ribs, Potato, Cannellini, Garlic, Onion, Shiitake, Cilantro

Beef Ribs, Potato, Cannellini, Garlic, Onion, Shiitake, Cilantro

Simmer Ribs, Garlic, Kosher Salt And Freshly Ground Black Pepper Until Ribs Are Almost Tender

Simmer Ribs, Garlic, Kosher Salt And Freshly Ground Black Pepper Until Ribs Are Almost Tender

Add Potatoes, Simmer Until Potatoes Are Almost Tender,

Add Potatoes, Simmer Until Potatoes Are Almost Tender, Set Aside

Saute Onions And Shiitake In Olive Oil Until Onions Are Translucent

Saute Onions And Shiitake In Olive Oil Until Onions Are Translucent

Add Beans

Add Beans

Add Ribs, Potatoes And Stock, Bring To A Simmer. Sprinkle With LOT'S Of Finely Grated Parmigiano Reggiano

Add Ribs, Potatoes And Stock, Bring To A Simmer. Sprinkle With LOT’S Of Finely Grated Parmigiano Reggiano

Bake Until A Golden Crust Is Achieved

Bake Until A Golden Crust Is Achieved

Sprinkle With LOT'S Of Fried Onions

Sprinkle With LOT’S Of Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef Ribs, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef Ribs, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

Gratinated Beef, Beans & Potato Stew With Fried Onions

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Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog, please be so kind and click on the video below.  ( You don’t have to watch it, just click once )   Thank you 🙂
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Satay’s Meet Rib’s

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I wanted  to prepare some chicken satay’s for some time now, but I just never got around to it. So on friday I bought chicken and other ingredients to finally get my satay fix. However, I also bought some pork rib’s, which got me thinking……. Peanut and pork is alway’s a great combination, so why not going that route. No reason not to !  So here we go,  Pork ribs  with an asian inspired peanut glace and  peanut  dipping sauce. Great success !  This will be one of my new standby’s for an informal dinner party 🙂
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Satay's Meet Rib's

Satay’s Meet Rib’s

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Ingredient’s :

Pork rib’s,
Peanut butter,
Hoi sin sauce,
Oyster sauce,
Soy sauce,
Scotch bonnet sauce,
Ginger powder,
Garlic,   granulated,
Coriander powder,
Turmeric,
Sour orange juice,
Lemon grass,   dried, chopped
Brown sugar,

Method :

Heat peanut butter with all ingredients except ribs. Add water and whisk until you have a smooth, thick sauce. Simmer for a few minutes.  Set aside most of it to marinade ribs for at least two days. Add some more water to the rest of the sauce to use as dipping sauce. Set aside. After two day’s, bake ribs on a water filled roasting tray, lightly covered with aluminum foil, at  180F for nine hours. Remove cover during the last hour to get a golden color.
(Best to put the rib’s in the oven in the morning, happily thinking about a great dinner to come during the whole day 🙂
The collagen will turn into gelatin, leaving the ribs tender and  succulent. Add  the juices from the roasting tray to the dipping sauce, simmer until the desired texture is reached. Strain. Serve with the dipping sauce, slices of raw onion, cucumber and tomato.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Fried Beef Ribs

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Another  one to shock beef rib traditionalist’s,
who will never know what marvel they are missing  😦

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Simmer ribs.
Debone ribs.
Give bones to Bella and all her friend’s.
Season ribs with salt, pepper, lime.
Apply standard breading.
Fry.
Serve with salad, horseradish, chili sauce.
Eat.
Be happy.

Life is Good !
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” Grilled Pork Chops & Grilled Veggies “

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I just love my little stove top grill. No-fuss grilling for one person.
It does not give me the deep grillmarks a larger, hotter grill would give me,
but the texture and taste are all their own   🙂
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Marinade all items with the pictured spices according to your own preferences   🙂

Bon Appetit !    Life is Good !
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” What Is A Real BBQ ? ” Part 3

Originally posted by Russ Ito on Salon Piquant
Re-blogged with permission of Ross Ito
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The best thing about The Food Network in the summer is that you only have to watch 10 minutes of any show, and you’ll know what 95% of the programming that night will be: BBQ. The mind-numbing monotony of these shows is astonishing: Hour after hour devoted to this pit versus that smoker. After a few minutes, it’s all a blur of: rubs, rings, and burnt ends; of mops, barks, and slaws. And geographically, it’s as if The Food Network doesn’t know that the Louisiana Purchase happened: The coverage is stuck in the South-east and Deep South, as if no one west of the Mississippi ever cooks meat over fire.

As someone who grew up in a Japanese household, I’ve never been a big fan of “traditional,” American BBQ, finding it far too dense and cloying. I much prefer the lighter styles of BBQ from Asian cuisines, including: Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, and Indian. All of these cultures are part of American society – and make great BBQ, but they never appear in TFN’s summer programming. Perhaps TFN thinks they’re too exotic to appeal to their audience, or maybe it’s more ideological.
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The imu — the original “pit BBQ.” How about it TFN?

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The Taliban wing of the BBQ cult would, no doubt, sniff that the Asian approach is: “not true BBQ.” To them, BBQ means: “low and slow,” long cooking over low heat. By their reckoning, most Asian “BBQs” are just “grilling,” i.e., fast cooking over high heat. OK, fair enough, but even if you accept that, the Polynesians were slow-roasting whole pigs in hand-dug pits for centuries (maybe millennia) before anyone started warming up a pit in Kansas City or Charlotte. So why don’t you ever see that on TFN?
And does it really matter? Isn’t it just rhetorical? Every culture has its own way to cook meats over fire, whether that’s in an imu, on a grill in a hibachi, or on a skewer in a tandoor – and all of these are part of American cooking! Jacques Pépin often talks about the diversity of American food choices as something that still excites him about food here versus in his native France: “One day you can have Turkish, the next Vietnamese, the next Italian, the next… Ethiopian! It’s great!” BBQ/grilling isn’t the mono-culture TFN would have you believe; it’s as diverse as American culture itself. It’s time TFN woke up!
So come on, TFN, break out of your comfort zone, and mix it up! There’s a lot of great BBQ happening west of the Mississippi, and guess what? Those states are all part of the union, too! Asian flavors are part of the American palate, so include them!
Of course, TFN isn’t going to listen to my ravings. They’ll pack this summer’s schedule with hour after hour of rubs and mops, and familiar arguments over briskets versus pork shoulders. I’ll watch ten minutes, and know I’m not missing anything. And besides, I’ll be spending most of July watching the Tour de France, anyway!
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” What Is A Real BBQ ?! ” Part 1

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In my humble opinion,

these days’ the word BBQ means different things to different people.
I have lately come to the conclusion that to the majority of folk’s BBQ describes a social gathering of one or more people, the main purpose is to cook out in the open, enjoy the weather, food and company. (Even BBQ restaurant’s used to cook their food outside).
Since each region, restaurant, family and grill cook swears that their version (smoking, grilling, open fire, covered grill, etc) is the gospel, describing BBQ as a cooking method seems rather futile to me .
However, I had many a chef getting his / her knickers in a twist discussing what BBQ actually and REALLY means, so I just accept whatever is the explanation of the day.
( Even the origin of the word Barbecue seems to have different proponents ).
If I take my classical french training into consideration, you have the cooking methods :
Grilling (never covered), Smoking (always covered) Jerking ( a combination cooking metod, since we grill, smoke and steam at the same time) and “the way of Life BBQ”, where we use any cooking method traditionally employed in our area and / or backyard, invite a bunch of friend’s and family over and have smoked, grilled, jerked food, maybe a barrel of beer and lot’s of fun.
BBQ – happy cooking outside, whichever way, as long as you are having fun !    🙂
Please give us your opinion in the poll below.

Live is Good !


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Brussels Grill: Mixed vegetables

Brussels Grill: Mixed vegetables (Photo credit: batigolix)

Beef and Corn on a Charcoal BBQ grill

Beef and Corn on a Charcoal BBQ grill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some chicken, pork and corn in the barbeque

Some chicken, pork and corn in the barbeque (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: a typical offset bbq smoker

English: a typical offset bbq smoker (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Image of a propane smoker in use. Dia...

English: Image of a propane smoker in use. Diagrams the elements. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Preparing grill for grilling, grill w...

English: Preparing grill for grilling, grill with flames and cones. Česky: Příprava grilu pro grilování, gril s plameny a šiškami. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Chicken wings being cooked slowly ove...

English: Chicken wings being cooked slowly over charcoal ashes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: "Little Chief" food smoker,...

English: “Little Chief” food smoker, popular in the Pacific Northwest for home smoking of fish and meat (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pork steaks cooking over a charcoal fire

Pork steaks cooking over a charcoal fire (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A barbecue on a trailer at a block pa...

English: A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. Pans on the top shelf hold hamburgers and hot dogs that were grilled earlier when the coals were hot. The lower grill is now being used to slowly cook pork ribs and “drunken chicken”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Can't claim credit for this cooking, my friend...

Can’t claim credit for this cooking, my friend Paul was responsible. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a traditional asado. The picture shows...

This is a traditional asado. The picture shows ribs grilled in the traditional Argentinean way. The meat is on top of the grill and the charcoal or wood at low fire under the grill. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deutsch: Bratwürste auf einem Grill

Deutsch: Bratwürste auf einem Grill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Español: Cocinando carne para hamburguesa al g...

Español: Cocinando carne para hamburguesa al grill. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Barbecue

Barbecue (Photo credit: Johann Richard)

The smoking setup - left

The smoking setup – left (Photo credit: ntang)

Pork ribs being smoked

Pork ribs being smoked (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cooks remove racks of herring from a tradition...

Cooks remove racks of herring from a traditional smokehouse (Heringsräucherei) (Photo credit: drakegoodman)

English: Barbecue grill trailer and church, In...

English: Barbecue grill trailer and church, Index, Washington. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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” Cook The Opossum, Spare The Bear “

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I usually don’t like to re-post other folk’s stuff, but this one deserves to be shared  🙂
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From : eatocracy, CNN

Barbecue Digest: Cook the opossum, spare the bear

Editor’s note: All summer long, the Southern Foodways Alliance will be delving deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain old deliciousness of barbecue across the United StatesDig in.

Today’s barbecue joints tend to serve just one or two kinds of meats, with pork predominate in the Carolinas and Georgia and beef the star out in Texas and Kansas City. Not so in the old days.

Back when barbecues were large-scale community affairs, the meat served was whatever people had on hand and could donate to the cause. Lists like the following, from a description of an 1868 barbecue in Spartanburg, South Carolina, were par for the course: “beef, mutton, pork, and fowls were provided in superabundance.”

At the largest events, the menus could be eye-popping. Perhaps the most extensive is the selection served at the 1923 inauguration of Oklahoma governor Jack Walton. The event was held in January, and just before Christmas, Walton sent out a call to Oklahoma farmers to donate animals for the event.

And donate they did. The final tally, as printed in the Dallas Morning News, included thousands of cows, hogs, sheep, and chickens plus 103 turkeys, 1,363 rabbits, 26 squirrels, 134 opossums, 113 geese, 34 ducks, 15 deer, 2 buffalo, and 2 reindeer that had been “shipped in from the North.”

A man from Sayre, Oklahoma, captured a live bear and offered him to the cause, too. But the bear won the sympathy of Oklahoma school children, who pooled their pocket change, bought him for $119.66, and donated him to the Wheeler Park Zoo. The bear was a crowd favorite for more than a decade.

The rest of the animals weren’t so lucky.

Today’s installment comes courtesy of Robert Moss, a food writer and restaurant critic for the Charleston City Paper and author of “Barbecue: the History of an American Institution”. Follow him on Twitter at @mossr.

Delve into more barbecue goodness from the Southern Foodways Alliance blog

Previously – In praise of pork rinds and Give squirrel a whirl and Burgoo with a smidge of squirrel
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