Steak Salad “Saigon”

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The  foundation of this steak salad is a refreshing rice stick salad, which I usually make at least twice a month. I normally make about four to six portions and eat it as part of a meal, as breakfast or as a late night snack. The noodles keep their texture for a few days without getting mushy, so this is ideal to prep in advance and then serve it when a quick bite is needed, especially on a workday as breakfast or as a snack late at night when I get home and just want to rest and more cooking is as far from my mind as possible. If I have it as part of a meal, I usually combine it with seafood, such as teriyaki- glazed salmon or sautéed shrimp. For breakfast, I usually add a couple of hard-boiled eggs and for a midnight snack some canned seafood. When Maria was still with me, she liked to serve it at bbq -parties, when it was a welcome alternative to the usual suspects of coleslaw and potato salad.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Steak Salad "Saigon"

Steak Salad “Saigon”

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Steak Salad "Saigon"

Steak Salad “Saigon”

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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2 comments

  1. Hi Chef Hans, hope all is well with you and Bella. Very nice healthy salad, lots of flavor, not
    hard to make, and can be enjoyed all of the time, can’t get tired of this Steak Salad, certainly
    beats some of the salads we do here, at home, and restaurants. Better hide that dish, Chef,
    Bella is ready to make a grab and run to a hiding place and enjoy, I would do the same.
    Chef, on another matter, I learned recently that Le Cordon Bleu Culinary training centers are
    closing, all 16 of them? What a loss, these culinary schools provided an excellent opportunity
    for our culinary students of the future! Johnson and Wales, CIA in Hyde Park NY, and the
    Las Vegas culinary schools, are still surviving. There are others scattered around the country,
    possibly too much culinary saturation, with loss of interest, also, these schools are expensive
    and with the economy that way it is, few can afford to attend, so they take the route of on the
    job training at a hotel company or restaurant.

    All the best Chef Hans, we all thoroughly enjoy the effort and commitment you have made,
    to give us all, an opportunity to be better cooks, and we open our eyes to culinary tastes
    worldwide.

    John R. Vicente CHA/3D

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Vincent.
      Your compliments are kind, as usual 🙂
      as for LCB, when CEC took over the American branch from LCB many years ago, it declined badly and steadily, and it has has been nothing but a student-mill for many years.
      Management on all levels were only interested on the bottom-line; culinary education was not of interest.
      For many years now, most of their teachers had only limited experience in the hospitality industry, some none and most never were managers in our industry.
      There is a reason I was not there anymore 🙂
      I will spare you the details but believe me, while there were still a few (very few) good teachers left who tried to do their best in a sea of mediocrity , the demise of LCB America is nothing to be sorry about 🙂 😦
      Best regards,
      Hans

      Like

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