classic food

Salade Lyonnaise

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Here  we have another  classic that shows and proofs why the classics don’t die: They are simply the best !
When all the pretty (and sometimes not so pretty) newfangled high flyers have simply faded away because of lack of substance, practicality and being too heavy on looks and too light on taste and texture, out come the classics again to remind us why they were our favorites in the first place : Taste, texture and simple, appetizing presentation, free from superficial nonsense. What better dish to proof my point than with this wonderful salad which will be equally good as appetizer, side dish, snack or even main course (See below )
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P.S.
Usually the poached egg is served liquid in the center, but, while I love eggs prepared this way, for my salad I prefer them a bit more waxy (depending on the size of the egg, add about 1 to      1,5  minutes to the cooking time of soft-poached egg)
 P.P.S.
Although smoked bacon is widely used, I prefer the taste and texture of fresh bacon for this dish. If you choose to use smoked bacon, you can forgo the step of simmering the bacon before sauteing.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Salade Lyonnaise

Salade Lyonnaise

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Salade Lyonnaise

Salade Lyonnaise

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Salade Lyonnaise

Salade Lyonnaise

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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” Chefs Weigh In On What’s Become Of Classic Culinary Techniques And Traditions “

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Excerpt from Eater.com:

[Art: Eric Lebofsky]

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012, by Gabe Ulla

The Culinary Institute of America recently announced that it would be giving its Escoffier Room restaurant a serious renovation. Adam Tihany will design this new incarnation, which will be a sleek brasserie called The Bocuse Room. With the name change and renovation will come a readjustment of the restaurant’s kitchen that moves away from the Escoffier system, reflecting instead Paul Bocuse‘s contributions to cooking and, more generally, the evolution of gastronomy.

Most would agree that the revamp is long overdue. But a New York Times articleabout the news did show that it got people thinking about Escoffier, old techniques, and whether or not the world of cooking has abandoned certain fundamental traditions relevant to any era. Is it possible to pinpoint certain techniques that cooks no longer focus on but should, or have we seen a logical evolution that preserves those foundations while incorporating new ideas and reflecting changing times? We asked five chefs from across the country to weigh in.

Here, now, Jonathan Benno (Lincoln Ristorante, New York), Daniel Patterson (Coi, San Francisco), Barbara Lynch (Menton, Boston), Chris Hastings (Hot and Hot Fish Club, Birmingham), and Ed Brown (Ed’s Chowder House, New York) take on the question……………….
Read more HERE
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