New York

Hans’ Pork Buns (Not David Chang’s Pork Buns)

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David Chang’s  pork buns have achieved a mythical status only American “foodies “would allow to be bestowed upon a simple steamed bun, smeared with hoisin sauce and topped with salt and sugar seasoned pork belly and pickled cucumbers.
When I had these wonderful little sandwiches a few years back in New York I was truly smitten by their delicious simplicity, but I never understood their immense cult following. My only explanation would be that pork belly, pickled cucumbers and steamed buns are fairly new to most folks who fall all over them self touting these “innovative” ingredients and combinations. (Kind of making fools of them self by flaunting their lack of experience with international cuisine while considering them self “foodies” and “experts”). Steamed pork buns are a traditional staple in many Asian cuisines, especially in China. There are infinite numbers of great variations out there, one better than the next.
Today, I want to introduce you to my own version of the pork bun. For this version, I am using kaiser roll (a very light version) instead of the traditional steamed bun and introduce my pork to a lot more flavor and texture. I consider my pork buns not necessarily to be better but definitely tastier and more textural interesting. You’ll be the judge 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Hans' Pork Belly Bun

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun

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Hans' Pork Belly Bun

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun

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top pork with cucumber/radish and coarsely chopped cilantro

top pork with cucumber/radish and coarsely chopped cilantro

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Preparation :
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season porkbelly with salt and saute until golden brown

season porkbelly with salt and saute until golden brown

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when brown, remove pork and set aside

when brown, remove pork and set aside

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 saute onions in garlic oil  until lightly caramelized

saute onions in garlic oil until lightly caramelized

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add hoisin sauce, grated ginger, garlic paste

add hoisin sauce, grated ginger and garlic paste

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add oyster sauce

add oyster sauce

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add say sauce

add soy sauce

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add sriracha

add sriracha

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return pork to pan, add water

return pork to pan, add water

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simmer covered until pork is tender but NOT falling apart, remove pork, set aside, reduce sauce until thickened and onions are very soft, check / adjust seasoning

simmer covered until pork is tender but NOT falling apart, remove pork, set aside, reduce sauce until thickened and onions are very soft, check / adjust seasoning

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meanwhile, slice radishes and cucumber into julienne, season with kosher salt, let sit for 20 minutes, squeeze dry, discard juices

meanwhile, slice radishes and cucumber into julienne, season with kosher salt, let sit for 20 minutes, squeeze dry, discard juices add rice wine vinegar and white pepper, check / adjust seasoning

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cut pork into bit sized pieces

cut pork into bite-size pieces

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cut kaiser rolls in half, toast lightly

cut kaiser rolls in half, toast lightly

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top both halves of buns with onion/sauce

top both halves of buns with onion sauce

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add pork to bottom half of bun

add pork to bottom half of bun

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top pork with cucumber/radish and coarsely chopped cilantro

top pork with cucumber/radish and coarsely chopped cilantro

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Hans' Pork Belly Bun

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun

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Hans' Pork Belly Bun

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun

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Hans' Pork Belly Bun

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun

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Embarrassing secret revealed below. Continue to scroll if you think you can take it………..
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Hans' Pork Belly Bun The actual dinner portion :-) :-(

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun
The actual dinner portion 🙂 😦

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Hans' Pork Belly Bun

Hans’ Pork Belly Bun

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Almost Vegetarian

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Yesterday’s  dinner plan was simple enough – just a few grilled vegetables and some tonkatsu dipping sauce. But when I started grilling and looked what was cooking, I felt I had to add a few little things, namely a New York strip steak, pork chop, morcilla and chorizo.  Now I had a meal 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

Tonkatsu Dipping Sauce Recipe

grilled strip steak, pork chop, morcilla, chorizo, tomato, asparagus, tomato

sauteed strip steak, pork chop, morcilla and chorizo, grilled tomato, asparagus, potato

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Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog, please be so kind and click on the video on the bottom of this page.
(You don’t have to watch it, just click once)   Thank you 🙂
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” Chefs Weigh In On What’s Become Of Classic Culinary Techniques And Traditions “

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Excerpt from Eater.com:

[Art: Eric Lebofsky]

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012, by Gabe Ulla

The Culinary Institute of America recently announced that it would be giving its Escoffier Room restaurant a serious renovation. Adam Tihany will design this new incarnation, which will be a sleek brasserie called The Bocuse Room. With the name change and renovation will come a readjustment of the restaurant’s kitchen that moves away from the Escoffier system, reflecting instead Paul Bocuse‘s contributions to cooking and, more generally, the evolution of gastronomy.

Most would agree that the revamp is long overdue. But a New York Times articleabout the news did show that it got people thinking about Escoffier, old techniques, and whether or not the world of cooking has abandoned certain fundamental traditions relevant to any era. Is it possible to pinpoint certain techniques that cooks no longer focus on but should, or have we seen a logical evolution that preserves those foundations while incorporating new ideas and reflecting changing times? We asked five chefs from across the country to weigh in.

Here, now, Jonathan Benno (Lincoln Ristorante, New York), Daniel Patterson (Coi, San Francisco), Barbara Lynch (Menton, Boston), Chris Hastings (Hot and Hot Fish Club, Birmingham), and Ed Brown (Ed’s Chowder House, New York) take on the question……………….
Read more HERE
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