Roast Cornish Hen With Caramelized Onions And Potatoes (Best Potatoes EVER?)

Roast Cornish Hen With Caramelized Onions And Potatoes

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Upon first glance, one’s impression would be that the Cornish Hen is the star of this dish.
While this is certainly the case in the looks-department, when it comes to taste, these potatoes do steal the show. (But of course, the Cornish Hen is awesome as well) 🙂
First, the potatoes and onions are coated in duck fat, seasoned with rosemary sprigs, kosher salt, and fresh-cracked black pepper, then slowly roasted until golden brown. Next, duck stock (or chicken stock)  is added,  topped with a whole Cornish Hen and roasted for another 45 minutes, during which time all the rendered fat from the Cornish Hen, together with its richly seasoned juices, oozes into the potatoes and combine to produce the best potatoes you will find this side of culinary heaven 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Cornish Hen  on  ChefsOpinion
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Roast Cornish Hen With Caramelized Onions And Potatoes

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Best Potatoes EVER?

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Roast Cornish Hen With Caramelized Onions And Potatoes

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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8 comments

  1. Ah, yes, meat and potatoes, great potatoes!
    The hens would be a great alternative to the big turkey for a couple or anyone not wanting to handle the big T-bird.
    Thanks, Chef Hans. I think you have laid out my Thanksgiving plans for the three of us in our house.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Godfrey,
      While I love braised turkey legs, for my personal consumption I prefer Cornish Hen to whole roast turkey anytime.
      However, when the family prefers the turkey feast ceremony, you might better give in 🙂
      Happy Thanksgiving !
      Cheers !

      Like

  2. THE ROAST POTATO COMES TO AMERICA………. HOORAY!!!! About time; but nobody seems to have heard of them. These are freely available here in UK (as well as chickens from counties other than Cornwall). Most restaurants will do them, and something like a Christmas (if I may be forgiven for using that word) lunch without them would be sacrilege.

    My preferred method would be to parboil the cut-up, peeled potatoes and then either place them in the drip pan underneath a roasting joint, or finishing them in goose fat (or both). One might add some parsnips to the pan, for roasting. Sea salt (which is just as kosher) is more readily available here.

    The vegetables served would probably vary according to the meat. Salad in winter in our climate is unlikely, and possibly less likely in the warm weather, too.

    Red cabbage is popular with game, and the oft-derided brussels sprouts go down well, too, with anything. Pork, of course, requires apple sauce, and beef needs horseradish sauce and/or English mustard, as well as Yorkshire pudding. Mashed potatoes can come as well – but the bread rolls are usually eaten with the soup! Did I mention the various stuffings available for game and poultry? Sage and onion, parsley and time, oatmeal, and bread sauce……….

    Christmas pudding with custard before the mince pies, port and nuts will keep everyone happy (and possibly asleep) for hours.

    Good, plain cooking with the freshest ingredients, with good wine and good company, constitute some of the greatest pleasures in life.

    Bless you all!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You will have to reaccustom yourself to European cooking (to some extent, at least). As you know, we tend not to go for spicy fare (unless it is Asian food), and Tex-Mex has never really caught on here, though herbs are widely used, and your putting rosemary on the spuds is lovely.

      Pickles tend to take over, and chutnies of all kinds (imported idea from India) before food preservation was as easy as it is now. I do like variety in my diet, and your recipe for snails………. All we need now is frogs’ legs provençal and we will be steaming.

      I am glad to hear that you are in better spirits, and, may I say, delighted that Bella is on the mend. Hopefully you will be able to give us an update

      Life is good, indeed!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Peter,
    Since nowadays I cook mostly for Bella and myself, as well as the occasional visiting friend, I cook dishes drawing from my experience as a cook, chef, and traveler, which has taken me to about 130 countries in 50 years. I don’t care so much about the local customs anymore, but rather about how my friends, Bella and I love the food we crave at the moment and are fortunate enough to mostly get exactly the dishes which we desire at the moment 🙂
    Cheers !
    Hans.
    .
    https://chefsopinion.org/2012/04/24/from-cook-to-chef-a-long-rewarding-journey/

    Like

  4. You are absolutely right, Hans: I share you views. I have been to, and worked throughout Western, Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans (last place I was shot at!), Egypt, Turkey, the Gulf, Russia, former Soviet republics and Central Asia, the US and Mexico, and, like you, have had myself taken to see local markets, as opposed to the “international” dishes served in Western-owned hotels. So often, the plainest dishes with the finest available ingredients, or whatever happens to be at hand, can be the most satisfying to prepare and eat.

    I have tried many dishes and have learned a lot on my travels, though I have never been a professional in the food industry – just Bailli de Londres in the Chaîne and Secretary of the Wine Committee of my (City of London) Livery Company. I have left the professional stuff to some of my family, one of whom rules the kitchens at an hotel in the Scottish Borders, and another owns and runs a ski chalet in the French Alps. Like you, I live alone and cook, mainly for myself (no dog); but I enjoy my cooking and entertaining, and am looking forward to Game Week, which is about to start.

    Don’t forget to tell us how Bella is recovering, will you?

    Santé du chef!

    Liked by 1 person

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