Roasting

Buffalo Poussin

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While  I am a big fan of buffalo chicken wings, I am even more fond of other proteins cooked-with or doused-in buffalo sauce. I prepare ribs, fish, seafood and even vegetables “buffalo style”, using my own home made buffalo sauce
Here is what I concocted today.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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All about  Poussin 
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Easy does it # 17 –  Hans’ Homemade Buffalo Sauce

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Buffalo Poussin

Buffalo Poussin

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Buffalo Poussin

Buffalo Poussin

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Black Bean Sauce

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This  dish will suit everybody with a taste for Asian flavors but no great desire to spend a lot of time prepping food in the kitchen 🙂
Although this will take about 3 – 4 hours to cook, the actual prep-time is only about 10 minutes, the rest is waiting patiently for the ribs to become tender. You could blanch them in simmering salt water before roasting to save about two hours, but the texture and flavor would be very different.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Bean Sauce

Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Bean Sauce

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Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Bean Sauce

Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Bean Sauce

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Preparation :
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season ribs with kosher salt, cayenne pepper, granulated garlic and five spice powder, cook at 230 F on a rack above a wter filled baking pan until very tender, about three to four hours, depending on the size and quality of the ribs

season ribs with kosher salt, black pepper, granulated garlic and five spice powder, cook at 230 F on a rack above a water filled baking pan until very tender, about three to four hours, depending on the size and quality of the ribs

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remove tender ribs from oven, heat oven to 420 F

remove tender ribs from oven, heat oven to 420 F

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meanwhile, make a basting sauce by whisking together fermented bean sauce, sweet chili sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil

meanwhile, make a basting sauce by whisking together fermented bean sauce, sweet chili sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil

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basting sauce

basting sauce

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baste ribs generously with the sauce on all sides, bake until starting to caramelize, baste again, caramelize again

baste ribs generously with the sauce on all sides, bake until starting to caramelize, baste again, caramelize again

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when nicely caramelized, remove from oven, sprinkle with sesame seeds

when nicely caramelized, remove from oven, sprinkle with sesame seeds

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to serve, sprinkle with finely sliced scallins

to serve, sprinkle with finely sliced scallions

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Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Bean Sauce

Asian Style Glazed Pork Ribs With Fermented Bean Sauce

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Spatchcocked Sautéed Cornish Hen With Arugula In Honey-Mustard Vinaigrette

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Traditionally,  when spatchcocking a bird to be served in a restaurant, one should remove the backbone and sternum. Not only will that allow the bird to cook easier, but also allow the guest to eat it more comfortable with fork and knife at the table.
However, for me, one of the best part’s of eating poultry is to gnaw on the bones, especially the backbones and remove the bits of meat from there 🙂  So, In order to satisfy my bone-gnawing graving’s, I just cut the bird in half, especially a very small one such as this cornish hen, then saute, roast or grill it, usually just seasoned simply with kosher salt, sriracha and granulated garlic.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Spatchcocked Cornish Hen & Arugula In Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

Spatchcocked sautéed Cornish Hen & Arugula In Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

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Spatchcocked Chicken “Nilda’s Way”

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Spatchcocked Chicken

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When my  mother in law , Nilda, was still healthy and living with us, she made roast  chicken over  potatoes and onions at least once a month. She did not  spatchcock  (what a funny word to say and write) the chicken, but rather left it whole to cook on top of the potatoes.  I  on the other hand, feel that to spatchcock the bird will give a superior result, both for the chicken and the potatoes. It will allow the potatoes to soak up all the juices and flavor from the chicken during the  cooking  process and at the same time it allows the chicken to cook very evenly, cooking all the way through but leaving both the legs and breast’s very juicy. Since the  coarse salt  will not all run down the side of the chicken as when you roast it whole, it will give the skin a unique texture, rather like a chinese style pepper & salt preparation. I used the same  spice mix  for the chicken and the potatoes / vegetables  – kosher salt, sriracha, melted butter, granulated garlic. Mix the seasoning and butter with the potatoes and vegetables. Rub the chicken on both sides with a generous amount of butter and seasoning. Place the potato / vegetable mix on a rack  which sit’s on a baking sheet, filled with half water and half red wine. Cook in the center of the oven at 390 F  for approximately two hours. My chicken was VERY big, so it took two hours to reach a internal temperature of 16o F. After removing the chicken from the oven and letting it rest for another 15 minutes, the carry-over heat will take the temperature to a safe 165. This will leave the chicken safe to eat and the meat, including the breast, very moist  and tender.
Finally, strain the jus from the sheet pan and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Serving suggestion : See pictures  🙂
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Marc Osten on culinary-compass :  Spatchcooking
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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