penetrate

Braised Teriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

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Braised  teriyaki chicken tastes more intense of teriyaki sauce than grilled or sautéed teriyaki chicken, because the braising process allows the sauce to penetrate the meat much better than marinating and then grilling or sauteing would.
However, if you only like your chicken skin crisp, this preparation might not be for you. But if on the other hand you do like the texture of a braised chicken skin (think  coq au vin  as a reference) and if you love the braising liquid/sauce from a well-seasoned braised dish (again, think of the great sauce a coq au vin will provide), this  “Braised Teriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks” will make you happy. The additional sauce from the chicken provides a wonderful coating to the already flavorful rice sticks.
Superb food, achieved with small effort and in little time. Life is Good !
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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Click here for more  Teriyaki Dishes  on  ChefsOpinion
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Click here for Coq Au Vin  on  ChefsOpinion
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BraisedTeriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

Braised Teriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

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Braised Teriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

Braised Teriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

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BraisedTeriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

Braised Teriyaki Chicken With Spicy Rice Sticks

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Corned Beef – Getting Ready For St Patrick’s Day

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Here  is the deal – you can of course buy corned beef ready-made :-(,  – or you can make your own, which in most cases will leave you not only with a far  superior product, but also with unbeatable bragging rights 🙂
Usually, you want to brine your brisket for about 10  days (depending on the size), but if you add the beef to a boiling brine, bring it back to a simmer for a few minutes, then cool it down in the brine, your beef should be ready after 4 – 6 day’s, again depending on the size of the brisket. (Cut it into smaller pieces if you are pressed on time, the brine will penetrate faster)
So, two weeks ago I bought 8 lbs of the finest brisket I could find –  grass-fed, organic – no added hormones nor added antibiotics. At about $ 10.00 a lb, this was a sizable investment, but judging after the first test, well worth the Mula. Bella agreed, as you can see in the pic below 🙂 Then there was the waiting time for ten days until yesterday, when I cooked the meat  for about 2,5 hours, (one more time – cooking time depends on the size of the brisket) and then, finally, corned beef wonderland !
Bella and I had some of it yesterday, the rest will be had for a variety of dishes for the next few days leading up to St Paddy’s day.
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Bon Appetit !   Life Is Good !

Click here for  Corned Beef Brine

Please note that I omitted the  Saltpeter  (potassium nitrate) in the brine of the corned beef. Saltpeter will turn the meat into the bright- red colored corned beef we are normally used to. However, I am trying to stay away from the stuff since my doctor has given me the news that all the medicine I am forced to take has messed up my kidney’s, most notably Metformin. Saltpeter is therefore not an ingredient I should use in my food. On top of that, if you want to use the stock from cooking the corned beef for a soup, you sure don’t want that soup to be laced with saltpeter ! After the corned beef is cooked, you want to strain the stock and reserve for further use for soup and/ or sauce. I will make a  Velouté  with some of the stock to make a horseradish sauce for my  “Corned Beef With Horseradish Sauce And  Colcannon. (Upcoming post).

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to serve, slice into 1'3 inch thick slices

to serve, slice into 1’3 inch thick slices

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Bella loves it :-)

Bella approves 🙂

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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