veloute

Chicken In Salt Crust

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One  of (culinary) life’s great mysteries for me is that so many people are buying roasted chicken at the supermarket.
Wrapping that chicken in a bag and eat it much later (sometimes hours) ruins both the texture and the flavor. I just don’t get it……… 😦
Yet, to buy a raw chicken, season it with salt, pepper,garlic and a bit of soy sauce, then roasting it in the oven is the most simple yet rewarding way to enjoy chicken.
Actual prep time is a few minutes, and nothing can beat the smell, flavor, crispy skin and moist flesh of a freshly roasted chicken 🙂
Sometimes I treat myself to an even more exquisite chicken, chicken baked in a salt crust. This preparation will not provide a crispy skin, but the divine flavor and moistness of the meat will more than make up for that. And if you have guests, the dramatic presentation and cracking open of the salt crust is most spectacular and well worth the extra effort to prep the crust.
So, either just as a special treat for yourself or when hosting guests, Chicken In Salt Crust  will surely be appreciated.
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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P.S.
I prepared and enjoyed this dish again last night at a friend’s house. Because of the amount of guests, I actually prepared four whole chicken and the meal was a great success.
My friend documented the whole process with her camera so I could use the pics for this post today, but as bad luck would have it, her camera ended up floating in the ice box – kaputt 😦
Therefore, the pictures and text below are from a previous post on ChefsOpinion from 2012 .
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“This is one of my favorite chicken recipes.
Season the inside with sriracha and salt, season the inside with sriracha and chopped cilantro, stuff chicken with orange quarters,lots of garlic and scallions. Then make the salt dough by combining egg whites,salt and flour, pack the chicken in it and bake it until the meat has reached a temperature of of 158. remove the chicken and let rest another 20 minutes before opening the crust. The carry-over heat will take it to a safe 165 temperature.
For most effect, crack and open the  crust table side. For  condiments and sides, you can go Chinese or western. Because the texture and taste reminds me so much of the time I used to live in Singapore and enjoyed “Singapore Hainanese Chicken Rice”, I usually go Chinese, but  just condiments, no rice or vegetables because together with
Bella we usually eat the whole thing in one sitting ! You can of course accompany it with steamed rice and maybe bok choy, or you can go western style and serve a western style vegetable and maybe mashed potatoes or noodles, in which case you probably serve it with a veloute to keep it all moist and tasty.”
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Chicken In Salt Crust

Chicken In Salt Crust

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Chicken In Salt Crust

Chicken In Salt Crust

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Chicken In Salt Crust

Chicken In Salt Crust

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EASY DOES IT # 16 –Velouté (White Cream Sauce)

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How to pronounce Velouté – click here
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Here  is a “Daughter” (added cream) version of one of the two  white  mother sauces (the other being Sauce Béchamel)
If you love to cook or just starting to learn, being able to prepare the mother sauces is a must.
The five  french mother sauces  are:
Sauce Béchamel, Sauce Espagnole, Sauce Hollandaise, Tomato Sauce, and Sauce Velouté.
Adding cream and lemon juice (and originally egg yolk) to a sauce made of stock, flour and butter will produce a “Sauce Allemande”
We have learned how to make  tomato sauce  in a previous  “easy does it”   blog, so let’s go straight to “Sauce Allemande”

Please note :  This is beef (or veal) velouté  (before adding the cream)
To make fish velouté, chicken velouté, seafood velouté, or fish velouté, replace beef (veal) with the appropriate protein.

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sauce velouté

Sauce Velouté

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Preparation :
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beef and/or beef bones, root vegetables, water, bring to a simmer, cook until meat is tender (if you use bones, simmer for one hour), remove meat (bones), set meat aside (discard bones)

beef and/or beef bones, root vegetables, water, bring to a simmer, cook until meat is tender (if you use bones, simmer for one hour), remove meat (bones), set meat aside (discard bones)

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strain stock through a fine sieve

strain stock through a fine sieve, discard solids

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skim fat from surface

skim fat from surface

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make a white roux of half butter and half a/p flour, add stock, whisk to avoid lumps, simmer for 15 minutes, strain through a fine mesh strainer

make a white roux of half butter and half a/p flour, add stock, whisk to avoid lumps, simmer for 15 minutes, strain through a fine mesh strainer

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add heavy cream, kosher salt and white pepper, check / adjust seasoning

add heavy cream, lemon juice,  kosher salt and white pepper, check / adjust seasoning

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voilà - sauce velouté

voilà – sauce velouté (with added cream)

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Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple



In  the late sixties and early seventies, this presentation of salpicon was at the forefront of culinary extravagance in Europe. Not because of the use of the salpicon, but because of the pineapple.
At that time,while everybody (most everybody) in Europe was familiar with canned pineapples, few had eaten a fresh one, simply because it was prohibitively expensive to fly in fresh fruit from the tropics or anywhere else for that matter. I remember having my first California strawberry outside of Germany’s strawberry season when I was 15 years old. We had a lot of food imports at the time, but most was carried in by truck or boat from other European countries and therefore more affordable. Even today, you will still find this pineapple presentation in many countries that cater to the less wealthy tourist’s. Often the chicken is replaced with seafood for an even more “exotic” dish.
So, many of my readers will probably enjoy this presentation for two different reasons:
One, because it is so old-fashioned that you don’t see it anymore,
or two, because they will remember it from “the old times”.
Either way, enjoy !

P.S.
Even without the pineapple presentation, who does not enjoy a chicken, veal or seafood salpicon once in a while? 🙂

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !


Click here for Chicken Velouté recipe

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice



Preparation:

soak triple washed long grain rice in cold water for one hour, drain , cook in salted boiling water until almost cooked, about 3 minutes, drain

soak triple washed long grain rice in cold water for one hour, drain , cook in salted boiling water until almost cooked, about 3 minutes, drain

cover airtight and let steam another five minutes, fluff with fork

cover airtight and let steam for another five minutes, fluff with fork

meanwhile, season chicken with salt and cayenne pepper, saute in garlic butter until half cooked, add chicken veloute, bring to a simmer, remove from heat, check/adjust seasoning

meanwhile, season chicken with salt and cayenne pepper, saute in garlic butter until half-cooked, add chicken veloute, bring to a simmer, remove from heat, check/adjust seasoning

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chicken salpicon and rice

fill hollowed half pineapple with salpicon

fill hollowed half pineapple with salpicon

sprinkle with panko bread crumbs and finely grated parmesan

sprinkle with panko bread crumbs and finely grated parmesan

bake until golden

bake until golden

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple

to serve rice, sprinkle with chili flakes and black sesame seeds

to serve rice, sprinkle with chili flakes and black sesame seeds

 

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice

Gratinated Chicken Salpicon In Pineapple With Rice





Dear Friend’s, to help support this blog,
please be so kind and click on the video on the bottom of this page.  Thank you 🙂





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