picanha

Hearts On Fire

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If  you have followed  ChefsOpinion  for some time, you know that I am very fond of  Offal.
I understand of course that not everybody shares this fondness, but for the most part, in most of the offal dishes that I blog about, the offal can be replaced with more  run of the mill  proteins, such as shrimp, chicken breast, sliced beef and even vegetables.
For the rest of us – offal rock! 🙂
In the past, when my wife and I used to go with friends to  Brazilian Churrasqueiras, everybody thought I was mad when I stuffed myself with grilled chicken hearts, while Maria and our friends enjoyed their Picanha, Entrana, and other more popular cuts. But for me, the meat-course always started with a bunch of chicken hearts. I was only ever able to find them in  Brazilian Churrasqueiras, so I always took advantage of the opportunity to indulge. Nowadays, I go out very seldom, so when the craving for chicken hearts hits me, I have to prepare them myself.
I prepare them in different ways, grilled, braised, fried or simmered in soup.
Last night I felt the need for something spicy, so I prepared the hearts as follows – I seasoned them with soy sauce and lots of garlic, coated them in corn starch and then fried them in pure chili oil. The result was truly “Hearts on Fire ” – they were hellishly spicy from the chili oil but the more subtle-seasoned bok choy toned it down a bit and when eaten together, the result was pure culinary bliss – very tasty,very spicy, very addictive 🙂
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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How to make Home Made Chile Oil
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Hearts on Fire

Hearts on Fire

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Hearts on Fire

Hearts on Fire

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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Picanha (Rump Cap) With Sauteed Potatoes, Morels And Cognac Cream

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Is  the act of cooking a steak well done treason to the cooking profession? 🙂
While many folks will answer me with a hearty YES to this question, I believe the beauty of enjoying the perfect meal is to get exactly what YOU like, not what others dictate you. I am a big fan of cooking my beef steaks rare to medium rare, yet I will completely support the well done camp if that’s what you prefer. So when my friends Peter and Marina requested well done steak for dinner last night, I tried to make the best of it. I went to my Argentinian butcher in Hialeah and bought a whole Picanha. Picanha (rump cap) is not a well known cut in many countries and therefore seldom cooked a la minute. You will more likely find it as a braise on the menu. While there is nothing wrong with that, you will miss out completely on one of the very best cuts of beef steak. Just know that you have to cook it VERY slowly. I cooked this one in the following manner:
Seared on all sides in a very hot grill pan, then removed to a rack and roasted in the oven at 145 F for 3 hours. Then one more time to a very hot grill pan for another 30 seconds on each side. Removed to a rack, lightly covered with foil and rested for twenty minutes before cutting into it.
The result was the most amazing, butter-tender, juicy, medium well done piece of meat you can imagine.
If you want to try Picanha at its best, try a “Brasilian Rodizio” or “Argentinian Parilla” where you will find it as the star of the menu 🙂
We all enjoyed this great meal with a couple of bottles of 96 Bodega Catena Zapata 2005 Argentino which they brought with them.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Rump Cap With Sauteed Potatoes, Morels And Cognac Cream

Rump Cap (Picanha) With Sauteed Potatoes, Morels And Cognac Cream

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