PORK AND NOODLES IN TWO PARTS – “PART TWO”

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Click here for  “Pork And Noodles In Two Parts – Part One”  on  ChefsOpinion
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Well  dear friends, here now is part two of “Pork And Noodles In Two Parts”.
As I’ve explained in part one,  “Crisp Yi Mein Noodle Pillow With Fiery Chile Pork” was not planned to exist in its final form, but I was glad it came about, because it was truly a beautiful, delicious dish I would not want to have missed.
It just goes to show that great food can be had by using simple leftovers, as long as one adds a bit of creativity and lot’s of love 🙂
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Bon Appétit !   Life is Good !
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P.S.
I like some of my chili dishes’ heat level to the point when the first few bites actually almost hurt, only to then morph into bliss full near-numbness and delightful tingling of the taste bud’s.
If you are less hard-core in the spice-department, adjust the heat level of this dish (or any other) by adding less chili paste.
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Crisp Chinese Noodle Pillow With Chile Pork

Crisp Chinese Noodle Pillow With Chile Pork

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Crisp Chinese Noodle Pillow With Chile Pork

Crisp Chinese Noodle Pillow With Chile Pork

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Preparation :
To read instructions, hover over pictures
To enlarge pictures and read instructions, click on pictures
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6 comments

  1. It looks excellent as always, Hans. My trouble tends to be in getting ingredients as our ethnic mix here tends to be rather different from yours, and the growing climate is also distinctly different. Even if I went to Soho and found someone who spoke English, I would perhaps not get all of the right stuff.

    A word about “heat”. We here have a lot of Indian and Bangladeshi restaurants although there are Pakistani places as well. Like many here, consuming curry became a challenge to see who could numb his mouth the most rapidly, clear all of the dishes and, er, still be all right in the morning (ahem!) Then I shared an office with a Brahmin for two years, and he taught me that the milder the curry, the more opportunity there is to bring out and savour the flavours.

    So I prefer mine mild, and have done for a long time….. but, as nearly always with food, so much is a matter of personal preference

    Eat well and enjoy your meals

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Peter,
    not all of the food I eat, curries, chilies or other sometimes spicy dishes are extremely hot. Some are not hot at all, some are mildly hot, some are moderately hot and yes, some are VERY hot 🙂
    It all depends on the dish and on the mood I am in. When I was still cooking professionally, it depended entirely on the taste of the guests, now that I cook mostly for myself and Bella, it is up to just my own whim 🙂
    (As for Bella, I wash-off whatever is too spicy for her, or remove some part of the dish before I add seasoning)
    Cheers !

    Like

  3. Stefan, I hate to correct you here, but your definition of sauté is not correct.
    I was the chair of the Spanish and English programs at Le Cordon Bleu and have practiced and instructed french cooking methods, among MANY other ethnic/classic cuisines, both as a teacher as well as a executive chef, around the world for nearly 50 years
    Classic french cuisine definition for Sauté:
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    “To cook quickly in a small amount of fat”
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    Simple, impossible to misinterpret 🙂

    “Satuer” or to “Sauté”
    Goal is to form a crust through the Maillard reaction
    Type: concentration – direct heat
    Humidity: dry – with no liquids or aromatics
    Color: à brun – from a direct heat source

    P.S.
    there are only SEVEN classic french cooking methods, while there are many more in other food-cultures.
    .
    The goal of old chef farts like myself is to keep-up the tradition while also learning new and sometimes improve the way we prepare food.
    However, one can not improve when one does not master the basics first !
    The problem nowadays is that too many folks are not willing and/or able to go through the process of tedious learning of the basics of a subject matter, but pick their favorites and think that makes them experts.
    (I don’t mean you here, just a generalization).
    This happens in most subject matters, not only in cooking, because there is such an immense saturation of facts and fiction out there that these get mixed-up more often than not.
    Stefan, from your post’s and comments I can see that you are way above average in your passion for food and cooking. I would very much like to be able to welcome you soon in our small group of “Keepers of the Flame” of enthusiasts who are very much open to the new and improved while at the same time preserving classic french cuisine in it’s entire glory 🙂
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    P.S.
    ChefsOpinion is obviously NOT a classic french cooking site. However, certain things need to be preserved and clearly labeled in order to hold up the quality and awesome wealth of classically prepared food, be it French or any other ethnic/classic cuisine !
    Best regards,
    Hans

    Like

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