Veal

Breakfast Of Champions # 32 – Milanesa Mexicana

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This  exact dish was my daily breakfast staple for a few months back in 1975, when I spend extended time vacationing in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.
At that time, Puerto Vallarta was still a smallish, sleepy city with few hotels and minimal night life. Puerto Vallarta became internationally famous after American director John Huston filmed his 1963 film The Night of the Iguana in Mismaloya, a small town just south of Puerto Vallarta. I still have a photo from 1975 which I took on the beach where Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton were having their “sexy” beach scenes. It was basically a deserted piece of beach where only a few hippies and locals hung out. In the shot I took, there are as many pigs as people roaming the beach.
Times and Puerto Vallarta sure have changed since then 😦
However, at the time, the group of friend’s I spent most night’s with was a show band from Ireland named “Los Irlandeses”. They performed at the night club of the only 5-star hotel in town, the Westin Hotel, located on a small beach just outside of town. Their show started at around 11.00pm five times a week and that’s when and where I usually started my evening. They made sure to talk to me from the stage when I got there during the show and treated me as if I were a VIP. Since this was the hottest place in town, this little game made sure that by the time the show ended at around 1.00 am, there were already a few groupies sitting on my table, ready to party with the guy’s from the band and I.
We usually partied until 6.00 or 7.00 am (we were very young and sleeping during the day when it was hot made sense. Only the tourists came for a tan 🙂
So, at that time of the day, we usually went to a restaurant/bar in an area close to the beach which served great food (all food was good at that time of day). Almost all the time my best friend at the time who was the drummer of the band and I ended up ordering the same dish, day after day – Milanesa, accompanied by guacamole, salsa mexicana and fried egg’s, washed down with a few Dos Equis beers.
This was the usual daily before going to bed ritual. The Getting out of bed ritual in the late afternoon usually involved  a couple of dos equis and a mexican style chicken and lime soup, containing shredded chicken, rice, vegetables and lots of cilantro.
So there you have it : Milanesa Mexicana and a few memories 🙂

Bon Appetit !   Viva Mexico !

Guacamole Recipe Link
Salsa Mexicana Link
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The Domino Principle, 1977

The Domino Principle, 1977

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Milanesa Mexicana

Milanesa Mexicana

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saute breaded pork, veal,  chicken or beef cutlets until golden and cooked to your desired doneness

saute breaded pork, veal, chicken or beef cutlets until golden and cooked to your desired doneness

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meanwhile, prepare sunny side up's

meanwhile, prepare sunny side up egg’s

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milanesa

milanesa

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top with guacamole

top with guacamole

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top with salsa mexicana

top with salsa mexicana

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top with sour cream

top with sour cream

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top with sunny side up egg's

top with sunny side up egg’s

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Milanesa Mexicana

Milanesa Mexicana

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“Milanesa” – Breaded Pork Cutlet, Bucatini & Hans’ Special Pasta Sauce

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When  I was an apprentice in the black forest in the sixties, “Veal Chop Milanese” (Kalbskotelett Mailänder Art), a slightly different version of the milanesa on this post, was a very popular dish. It was one that I was hoping to be able to afford to eat when I finally became a cook and earned a bit of money. It was a bread and parmesan breaded, ham and cheese stuffed chop of milk-fed veal, typically served on top of spaghetti with tomato sauce. However,  while still an apprentice, a veal chop was out of my financial reach and so I had to wait a few years before I could actually afford to dig into one. In the meantime, the far more affordable version was made of a breaded pork chop instead of milk-fed veal. Great food too, but not exactly the real thing 😦
Here now is my own version of a  “Schweinesteak Mailänder Art” :
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Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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Breaded Pork Chop

Breaded Pork Chop “Milanese”

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Breaded Pork Cutlet, Bucatini & Hans' Special Pasta Sauce

Breaded Pork Cutlet, Bucatini & Hans’ Special Pasta Sauce

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Milanesa

Milanesa

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Ham& Cheese Stuffed Pork Cutlet

Ham& Cheese Stuffed Pork Cutlet

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” Naan, Veal Ribs & Other Stuff “

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Last  night’s dinner made me realize that I eat a lot of comfort food which does
not necessarily fall into a specific group or cuisine. Sometimes, just raiding the
fridge without a grand plan and simply putting some stuff together on the fly
does produce some great dishes. This was one of them :
Naan with ribs, chilies, onions and yoghurt ”
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Ingredients :

Veal ribs,                  simmered, bones removed
Naan,                        Generously buttered and sprinkled with sea salt
Greek yoghurt,
Chilies,                     finely diced
Lime,                         juiced
Garlic,                       paste
Scallion,                   sliced
Onions,                    rings
Sesame seeds,
Oyster sauce,
Sriracha,
Soy sauce,
Teriyaki sauce,
Kosher salt,

Water,

Method :

Blend all ingredients except ribs and half of the chilies.
Put a bit of water into a small, rimmed pan, into which
the ribs just fit, one layer only. Add the ribs.
Cover ribs with the sauce, (the sauce should be very watery
at this point) cover airtight and bake in
a low heat oven until very tender, about 3.5 hours.
When the ribs are tender, the sauce should have thickened
and cling nicely to the ribs.
Arrange rib meat on hot naan, drizzle with yoghurt, add onion rings,
sprinkle with chilies, sesame seeds and scallions and serve with a
garnish of spinach salad and sliced lime.

Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !

” Veal Broth With Matzoh Ball’s & Veal Rib’s “

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For many year’s I buy most of my beef, morcilla and chorizo from an Argentinian butcher in Hialeah who sometimes calls me for “specials”.
Usually those are offal and other cuts he has difficulty selling to his American customers, but which he knows I treasure. His older Latino and Haitian customers are also not afraid of that stuff, but the younger crowd usually prefers more mainstream cuts. Wednesday he called me because he had some “specials”. To my surprise, when I got there the specials were veal ribs. It is beyond me why he called me for these, because clearly everybody loves ribs. ( Maybe he was just trying to be nice, not usually one of his outstanding attributes  🙂  Anyway, for $4.50 a pound I did not complain and came home with 10 pound of them (Plus some other goodies)
So here we go :
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Soup:
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Simmer ribs with celery, carrots, onions, leek, garlic, ginger, star anise and chopped tomatoes until ribs are tender, about 2 hours.
Remove ribs, set aside. Strain broth, season with salt, cayenne pepper, lime juice and maggi seasoning.
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Matzo Balls Recipe: 
1 cup matzo meal
3 eggs
3 tblsp oil or rendered chicken fat
1/4 cup seltzer (exact amount depends on the size of the eggs and the coarseness of the matzo meal)
3 tblsp finely chopped parsley (optional)
Kosher salt and white pepper to taste
Mix all wet ingredients together, then fold in matzo meal, salt and pepper and place in refrigerator for 15 minutes. Shape into golfball sized balls, drop into boiling water, cover, turn down to a simmer and cook for 20 to 30 minutes or until fully cooked (cut one in half to check if it’s done).


To serve, combine ribs, broth and matzo balls , sprinkle with
chopped cilantro or sliced chives. Grated parmesan optional.
(Not kosher, but I use it anyway)
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Es gezunterheyt !   עס געזונטערהײט !   Life is Good !
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