Imperial Fried Rice

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Time to get excited about  fried rice 🙂
No, not the cabbage and soy sauce laden one you get for two bucks at your corner chinese restaurant. No, I am talking about  my treasure chest of a fried rice which has a whole bunch of goodies in it. Each one (shrimp,chicken, lap cheong, ham, eggs, vegetables), fried on it’s own with rice would make a good fried rice, but here the combination of all of this stuff together makes it a truly memorable dish.
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Imperial Fried Rice

Imperial Fried Rice

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Ingredient’s :

Fan  (飯),   day old chinese steamed rice (Recipe Here)
Chicken,   cubed
Shrimp,   peeled, tail on
Ham,   diced
Lap cheong,   fresh, unsmoked
Scallion,   sliced
Bean sprouts,
Red/green bell peppers,   diced
Onions,   diced
Kernel corn,   blanched
Green peas,   blanched
Eggs,   whisked
Garlic,   paste
Ginger,   grated
Kosher salt,
Cayenne pepper,
Sesame oil,
Peanut oil,   to stir fry

Method :

Season protein and vegetables with salt and cayenne pepper. Saute (stir fry) chicken in oil until medium, remove chicken. Saute shrimp, ham and sausage until shrimp are 3/4 cooked, remove. Saute vegetables, ginger and garlic until fragrant, add rice, fry until rice starts to puff a bit. Form a whole in the center, add more peanut oil, add the eggs. Styr fry until the eggs have set, return proteins to the rice and stir fry until rice starts to pop again. Add bean sprouts, season with sesame oil, salt and pepper. To serve, sprinkle with scallions and more bean sprouts.


Bon Appetit !   Life is Good !
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10 comments

  1. Hi Hans!

    Love your blog, genuinely! Chef Darel here. “Imperial fried Rice”, huh? Looks pretty good brother, however I refer to this treasure trove simply as “fried rice”. I too am a huge proponent of the dish (when made correctly…). I’ve yet to sample a decent fried rice from any “Chinese- centric” restaurant that my wife and I have visited in the last 10 years. That doesn’t say much for our present local eateries, but it is a general statement directed at most pan- pacific and Eurasian establishments that we have visited throughout the U.S.

    I tend to find that the foods prepared by these microcosms tend to emanate from the regions that cooks are from. Their palates are tend to lend themselves more to the aromatic and natural flavors produced from fresh ingredients. Where as we incorporate fish sauce, sesame oil and oyster sauce to name a few. Let’s face it. Soy sauce as well as the local variety of artisanal sausages can be found from Chengdu to Guongdong. But not all of these “microcosms” incorporate or can afford shrimp, ham, Char Sui pork and a host of ingredients that you or I might incorporate in our respective results. Lol.

    Food prepared in a fine restaurant in Kowloon will be significantly different from food prepared in small “mom & pop” hole in the wall. I genuinely believe that we (Americans) have shaped the vision and profile of “Chinese” food. I would be so daring as to say that this genre was “reverse- engineered or created”. It came to the U.S. as a very good alternative to the standing U.S.A diet, but it went through an evolutionary process over the last 15- 20 years. Ketchup is a key ingredient in a few very popular sauces today along with orange sauce.

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  2. Hi Chef,
    I like the way you broke down the cooking of the protiens at different times. Question rice puff? I do this on my Youtube channel using a home burner, pretty hard to maintaine high heat with everything in at once. Next time I do a fried rice I will try this method, I’ll pass credit to you, and mention your page.
    Chef John the Ghetto Gourmet

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  3. Thank’s John, very kind of you, pls let me know when you post it 🙂
    When the rice get’s hot enough on the surface of the pan or wok, it starts to “dance’ or “puff”.
    Just don’t overload the pan, don’t use too much fat and make sure the pan is VERY hot.
    Bon Appetit !

    Like

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