Pasta. Basta !

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Pasta !
Sometimes, in our quest to create ever more complicated, fancy, elaborate, inventive, trendsetting dishes, we tend to forget why we fell in love with a food item in the first place. In most cases because in it’s true form and simplicity, it is perfect and can’t be much improved. It can be altered, changed, made more fancy, more colorful, spicier, fattier, more unrecognizable, deconstructed, more expensive (yep) or whatever,  but in its original form, texture, and flavor it will alway’s be the star it has originally been. Without a doubt pasta is one of these food items. If properly prepared, it needs little or no embellishment to satisfy most senses. “Pasta Aglio E Olio”  or, my personal favorite, Pasta Aglio E Burro” are the most basic dishes which, when prepared with love and knowledge, will produce the most satisfying meal or separate course in a meal. Here we have another basic, “Bucatini  Pomodoro”

Cook pasta about 3/4 to doneness, drain, reserve some of the cooking water. Saute roasted garlic paste in butter or  olive oil, add chopped peeled tomatoes, add a few sprigs of basil, simmer until tomatoes break down. Remove basil sprigs, blend tomatoes with a stick blender. Season with kosher salt and  cayenne pepper. Add pasta, some of the cooking water, butter and finely grated pecorino and simmer until pasta is al dente. Add more water during the simmering if needed. To serve, sprinkle with more cheese.

Buon Appetito !   Life is Good !
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Pasta Pommodoro

Pasta Pommodoro

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12 comments

  1. Spaghetti Aglio E Olio always makes me think of my Italian father. It was his favorite meal and he would often make it for himself. As a child, I would come home and complain how the entire house smelled of garlic and he’s say, “honey, that’s the sweet smell of Italian Roses”.

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  2. spaghetti Aglio E Olio always makes me think of my Italian Father. It was his favorite meal and he would always make it, especially when he found himself dining alone. As a child, I’d come home and complain that the entire house smelled of garlic. He’d say…”Honey, that’s the sweet smell if Italian Roses”.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love it…simple and good. Tasting a piece of italy reading your words my dear master. Thanks for remember to everyone the importance of the cooking water to add to give the flavor..

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  4. I know that this is the way to make the Italian pasta in the restaurants to cook mostly done and mix with the ingredients and it’s not bad, but by my Sicilian family’s tradition, it’s done a bit differently, and mostly about the sauce, meatballs and sauzeech. The sauce is slow cooked all day, the pasta is aldente. The sauce is not mixed in with the pasta, but displayed on top where the juices can flow through top to bottom. The graded cheese is aged very sharp but shaved fresh on the top of the whole dish add your meatballs and sauzeech, I like some fresh Basile leafs as a flavor adder and also for looks. I believe that a good sauce goes a long way and anyone who is really Italian will know that separating the pasta from cooking the sauce is better , like you said simplicity… but for me it’s more about being able to separate the flavors of everything , like when ppl have large chunks of potato and meat in a very good stew. A good sauce will have all the aspects needed in the proper density, a bit watery and mostly dense and thick. This is why it’s not needed to cook with the pasta into the noodles. The noodles have their own flavor, a bit bland but with a hint of saltiness. The meatballs should finish cooking in the sauce, be tender, flavorful, and share the flavor with the sauce, the sauzeech should also be finished cooking with the sauce, be able to cut with a fork very easily. That’s what I believe is right, the best and as you said, should not be improved on.You can’t improve on perfection of a thousand years. In my mind the restaurants do it wrong. The only place you can get a home cooked meal is at home , with family!

    Liked by 1 person

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